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Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

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COLUMBUS – The Little Sisters of the Poor/Sacred Heart Home in Oregon was listed among the Top 25 Ohio Nursing Homes for Family Satisfaction in the 2008 Nursing Home Resident Satisfaction Survey, released recently by the Ohio Department of Aging.

The facility was listed among 16 facilities that scored 100 on both key survey questions (“Overall, do you like this facility?” and "Would you recommend this facility to a family member or friend?”)

The survey also showed that statewide, family members of nursing home residents are generally satisfied with the care their loved ones receive. The statewide average satisfaction score for facilities was 88.2, up from 86.6 on the same survey two years ago. Twenty-five facilities scored 94.9 or better.

The satisfaction ratings and other information about nursing homes in the state are available on the Ohio Long-term Care Consumer Guide at www.ltcohio.org. Ohio is one of only a handful of states that includes customer satisfaction data in the information it provides consumers online.

“The more tools that are available to consumers and their families as they make important decisions about care providers, the more likely they’ll be to get the quality care they need and want,” said Barbara E. Riley, director of the department. “When you are trying to pick the right facility for Mom, Dad or another loved one, certainly you would want to know what the family members of current residents think. This survey provides that insight.”

The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services have unveiled a new system for ranking nursing homes on its Web site. The system has drawn criticism in part because it does not take resident and family satisfaction into account.

“Ratings are certainly an easy way to evaluate a nursing home, but consumers looking for the right care should look at much more than how many stars a facility gets to determine if it is right for them or their loved ones,” added Beverley Laubert, the State Long-term Care Ombudsman, whose office oversaw the survey. “For the complete picture, you should compare ratings with the opinions of those who receive services, as well as with your own experiences during a personal visit to the home.”

The survey asked family members their opinions on activities, administration, admission, choices, direct care and nursing, laundry, meals and dining, social services, therapy and general satisfaction. Researchers identified two key questions: “Overall, do you like this facility?” and “Would you recommend this facility to a family member or friend?” Sixteen facilities scored 100 on both questions.

The family satisfaction survey was conducted between June and December 2008 by the Scripps Gerontology Center of Miami University on behalf of the Ohio Department of Aging. More than 24,500 family members participated. Of the 630 participating facilities with statistically significant results, 333 scored above the state average, earning them an additional “quality point” in a reimbursement formula used by the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services. Survey costs are supported by a fee charged to nursing homes by the state.

The most recent family satisfaction data joins the results of the resident satisfaction survey conducted last year. In 2009, the Department of Aging will repeat that survey of residents.

About the Long-term Care Ombudsman - The Office of the State Long-term Care Ombudsman advocates for consumers receiving home care, assisted living and nursing home care. They work to resolve complaints about services, help people select providers and provide information about benefits and consumer rights. Ombudsman staff and volunteers make regular visits to nursing homes. Call toll-free, 1-800-282-1206, to learn more or to volunteer.