The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

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Just when you thought the weather warmed enough to start enjoying the great outdoors, something sinister takes all of the fun from being outside ... mosquitoes!

Many people find the cold weather isn't a walk in the park, but at least it keeps bugs at bay. Once the weather warms, those biting flies, no-see-ums and other pests start hatching and wreaking havoc. One of the more prolific pains in the neck, arms, legs -- wherever else they can bite you -- are mosquitoes.

Mosquito Facts
With more than 200 known varieties, mosquitoes live in many regions of the world where the weather is consistently warm. The name mosquito is a derivative of a Spanish or Portuguese word meaning "little fly." The name dates back to the late 16th century. Native Hispanic Americans called mosquitoes "zancudos," which translates to "long-legged."

Mosquito
Water trapped in gutters is a prime breeding
ground for mosquitos during warm weather
months.

Whatever name they are called, mosquitoes are a nuisance. But they also can be quite dangerous. That's because mosquitoes can transmit diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, dengue, filariasis, and encephalitis to humans and animals, according to the American Mosquito Control Association. Their bites and swarms on farm animals can cause weight loss and decreased milk production as well.

Mosquitoes play some positive roles in nature, including a food source for other predator species. Generally, however, they are not crucial insects to have around.


Mosquito Control
What makes people so attractive to mosquitoes is the subject of much inquiry and research on the part of companies hoping to build a better mosquito repellent. The universally recognized reason mosquitoes seek out warm-blooded animals is carbon dioxide. The AMAC says that mosquitoes can sense expelled carbon dioxide up to 35 meters away. Additional attractants include sweat and lactic acid produced by the body.

Some of the best ways to prevent attacks is by limiting the number of mosquitoes around -- which means eliminating breeding grounds. Mosquitoes like standing water in which to lay their eggs. These are good places to start.

* Find standing water. Eliminate all sources of standing water. This can include flower pots, children's toys, unused tires, pool floats -- anywhere that has a depression that can collect water. Even uneven areas of the lawn can provide a cozy spot for water to congregate.

* Clean gutters. Water trapped in gutters due to debris is a prime spot for mosquitoes to land and lay eggs.

* Move pond water. A water pump that produces a fountain effect or simply circulates water around in a pond prevents standing water from occurring.

* Treat mosquito haunts. Carports and other shaded overhangs are prime roosts for mosquitoes. A bug zapper or other repellent in that area can eradicate a few of them.

* Investigate BTI. BTI or, bacillus thuringensis, is a natural organism that can be put into places where mosquitoes normally breed. The larvae consume the BTI, and it kills them before they can turn into full-grown mosquitoes. BTI, sometimes called "Mosquito Dunks," is sold most commonly in doughnut-shaped briquettes that can be placed around the landscape. They're nontoxic and safe for wildlife, but not recommended in water used for human consumption.

* Explore mosquito predators. While it's not wise to overrun a property with mosquito predators that may get out of control, a few well-placed foes of the blood-suckers may do the trick. Here are some insects and small animals that feast on mosquitoes:

- water fowl and other birds
- dragonflies
- mosquitofish (dine on larvae)
- guppies
- bats

Attract these predators to the yard, and there may be an all-natural mosquito control available.

Water trapped in gutters is a prime breeding ground for mosquitoes during warm weather months.

Ebola outbreak

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