biggestweek2014cover
MedDirCover
HousingHeaderSmall
EMBCCover 

 linkedinfacebooktwitter

WTOLLogo1

Home Opinions/Columns Letters A good place to start
A good place to start
Written by Larry Limpf   
Friday, 03 October 2008 16:06
To the editor: It looks like Genoa Schools Superintendent Dennis Mock and his wallet raiders are at it again.    They are trying to get in a sneakier way by asking for fewer mills on our taxes – 1.9 mills instead of the 4.9 mills that was defeated in March. Eventually he plans to get the rest of the 4.9 mills by going for fewer mills in the future till he gets the whole 4.9 mils.

Bill Nye, district treasurer, in a statement in the Blade’s Neighbors East section May 8 said the people who voted no weren’t completely knowledgeable about all of the details. Fifty-two percent of the voters know what the word “no” means. It is Mr. Nye who doesn’t know what the word means.
There are school officials who are double-dipping the system. They lose one paycheck and they still have one to fall back on. Most of us have only one check to rely on. The way our economy is now, jobs are leaving at an alarming rate. There are retirees who have to make it on a fixed income. No increases. Time to cut spending till things are better.
Is it true it costs about $16,000 of our money to keep putting the levy on the ballot? A good place to start cutting expenses.

Vote no on the Genoa Schools levy.
John Saronzkowski
Genoa

A great thrill
To the editor: Last Thursday Sept. 25 was one of the greater thrills of the year when I attended the Clay High School Wind Research Facility wherein a turbine was hoisted near the soccer field on Corduroy and Stadium roads.

This science project was led by science teacher Dennis Slotnick who has brought together people from Sun Oil Co., BP Oil, Jeffers Crane Service, T.A.S. Electrical, a grant from the government through U.S. Rep. Marcy Kaptur, the City of Oregon, Department of Natural Resources, Owens Community College and many more to make the project fly.

I have been interested since the early 1980 and have information on the S. California Field of Wind Generation from Dr. Mathew Isaac, a graduate of the Toledo University.

My hope is to see the other Clay High School students studying the project as well. Thanks to Clay High administration and to future students, we are harnessing electric power in Oregon on the Bay.
Robert L. Fondessy
Oregon

A positive change
To the editor: Nov. 4 is the date many people are counting on for change on many issues. Genoa Schools will be asking us to vote yes on a 1.9-mill levy for the changes our schools so desperately need. Voting yes will enable us to build a new K-5 elementary and make renovations to the high school with help from state funding. The average homeowner will pay around $58 to $147 annually or $5 to $12 monthly.

Anyone who has had the opportunity to view the current facilities our children and grandchildren attend daily knows this would be a positive investment. An up-go-date school system with the current and dedicated staff is the cornerstone of any fine community. Not only will a great educational system open doors for our children, but will also draw future investment into our area.

As a mother of young children, one already in the school system, I am encouraging you to take the time and vote yes. Remember, this is our last opportunity to rebuild our educational system with state funding help. The inevitable will be we will be on our own with a much higher price tag.

Help make a positive change to our community.
Melissa Pollauf
Martin

Kids come first
To the editor: “Kids Come First,” and their academic, social and emotional success are our top priority. We are proud to be a part of the Genoa Schools’ educational team. Our dedicated and professional staff members strive each day to provide a high-quality technologically enriched learning experience for our kids. We focus on creating an environment that provides our children the best developmental experiences centered around the love for lifelong learning.

We sincerely appreciate the continued parental and community support. Cooperative and collaborative efforts from all will help our students become world class learners and leaders of the future. As administrative team members, we support our teachers in their daily dedication to enhance student learning and achievement. As parents, we applaud our staff for their passion and commitment to making a lifelong impact on the lives of our children.

Please help us in our efforts to put kids first by voting yes on Nov. 4. This is our last chance to capture our 75 percent of state funding for our new elementary. Your yes vote will provide our students a new K-5 elementary with renovations to our existing high school. Our children are our future. Help us put our kids first. Vote yes on Nov. 4.
Cari Buehler, Assistant Principal, Allen Elementary School
Brenda Murphy, Principal, Allen and Brunner

A true educator
To the editor: I wanted to thank you for the article you wrote about Marcia Punsalan and her Honors Literacy Inquiry class.

This article hits on why she was such an inspiration to me in high school. Ten years ago, she told me I could do
anything I wanted, could achieve any dream I reach for, and without her, I don't think I would have attended college, and I certainly don't believe I would have moved far away from home with the belief that I can make anything work for me.

I am glad to hear that Ms. Punsalan in still changing the lives of her students and happy that she received some much deserved recognition. I haven't talked to her since I graduated, but to this day I remember the lessons she taught me as a student, as the editor of the paper and as a human being.

Good work on recognizing the efforts of a true educator.
Kristi M. McEowen
Foster Care Social Worker, Lutheran Children and Family Service
Via e-mail

Responsible actions
To the editor: I have always been extremely grateful to The Press reporters for helping expose the wrongdoing and mismanagement that has too often occurred in our community of Jerusalem Township.

I always felt they compared us to the “normal” behavior that should occur in such a community. In the case of your Toledo Edison story, I see no comparison to the normal procedure in other power plants. I worked there for 35 years and always observed officials who strived to take the most responsible action in regard to community welfare. In fact, in every instance, more was done than required to make our plant safe and environmentally sound.

Bay Shore was started up in 1955 so for 50 years if all was done you spelled out; it seems there would be no fish left in the lake. The truth is the large majority are returned to the lake to swim away. Also, by simple observation, it could be determined that birds, ducks, geese and others in the food chain feasted on what did not swim away.

I appreciate the reporting you do. Please lay out the whole story.
Ray Cedoz,
Retired Jerusalem Township Trustee and retired Edison employee.

Editor’s note: The numbers in last week’s issue of The Press of fish and fish larvae impinged or entrained at Toledo Edison’s Bayshore Plant intake valves are taken from a study done over a 16-month period in 2005-06. The study was performed by research firm Kinetric because of a request from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency to FirstEnergy/Toledo Edison.

Admit mistake
To the editor: Scott Pennington appears to be hiding behind his disability.   Hiring a lawyer that specializes in disability law proves that point.  I know many people who are disabled in one way or another, yet they are able to think for themselves, and they also know right from wrong.  Mr. Pennington was wrong and he would be teaching all the students a very valuable lesson if he would just admit he made a mistake and was willing to accept the punishment for his actions.  To blame that kind of behavior on a disability is teaching everyone that if you have a disability it is OK to act however you want.  Mr. Pennington, take one for the team and do what is right, please.
Jeff Chonko
Walbridge

Editor’s note: The Lake Board of Education has upheld a decision to ban Mr. Pennington from athletic events after an incident at a baseball tournament sponsored by the Ohio Baseball Congress in which his son was playing.
Comments (0)Add Comment

Post a comment
Login on the right column to post a comment. Please register if you do not have an account yet.

busy
 

Polls

If you found a penny on the floor, would you pick it up?
 

The Current Weather for Millbury, OH USA

Login




Log in