The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

Share

To the editor: Is it a payback? Yes! Is it a vendetta? You bet!

Using a song title from that old country classic, “There’s a Tear in My Beer Over You,” it seems to paint the perfect picture of what’s happening in the Pete Gerken family household now. With the defeat of Pete’s wife, Polly, for Toledo City Council, it should have sent a clear message not to send more family members to be humiliated by East Side voters. After the sneaky and cowardly way in which Gerken, fellow Lucas County Commissioner Tina Skeldon Wozniak and State Rep. Peter Ujvagi used secret meetings to void 2001 election results to relocate the new arena downtown, they should have known better than to try another back-door deal on East Toledo voters.

Two years ago, Skeldon Wozniak tried it with her kin, Marty Skeldon. Poor Marty had no way of knowing he was bushwhacked by East Toledo hockey fans. Yep, we have family and friends in every district. This whole issue of how the new arena ended up in downtown can only be resolved when Gerken, Skeldon Wozniak, Ujvagi, developer Larry Dillin and the rest of those downtown backstabbers have resigned or are under investigation. Until that time, listen and learn from the worlds of the U.S. Marines 1st Raider Battalion in World War II.

 

Wake Island 1941...shortly after Pearl Harbor...After killing 500 Japanese invading soldiers, sinking and damaging Japanese transport vessels and shooting down numerous planes, this message was sent to command headquarters: “Send us more Japanese!” Message to county commissioners: “Send us more relatives!” Ha! East Toledo!
Sam Tarsha
East Toledo
 

Our future?
To the editor: Last month, we learned 24 high school students stood around for two hours and watched as five or six boys beat and multiple times raped a 15-year-old girl.

That could not have happened when I was a teenager. At least one skinny boy would have stood up to them. He may have gotten beat up, but he would have stopped them.

If there were no boy there with courage to interfere, one or two young ladies would have stepped forward and stopped it!

Last year we learned that 70 percent of the high school students in Detroit do not graduate. They drop out. 

Recently we watched on TV as a group of high school students in Chicago beat a student to death. Then we learned that in the last three years 37 high school students have been killed in Chicago high schools.

High school students represent the future of our country. What do these events mean to our future? What will our country be like in 20-30 years?
Louis Agoston
Toledo


Thank you
To the editor: It was a warm sunny Saturday the 14th of November, when the postmasters adopted a kettle for the Salvation Army.

The following postmasters took part in this all-day event: Sue McDaniel - Harbor View; Jordan Davenport - Port Clinton; Julie Paule – Lindsey; Dennis Carothers – Gibsonburg; Catherine Garcia – Pemberville; Rochelle Bower - Rocky Ridge; Mary Lou Paskowski – Dunbridge; Rufus Wallace - Clay Center; Michelle Woods - Lakeside-Marblehead; and Laretta Rydman (retired) - Walbridge.

We want to say thank you to the patrons of The Andersons for making this a memorable day. Those who will be helped by your generosity will be thankful also.

Thank you to those parents who pointed out that we need to teach our children to help those who are in need. Most of all we want to thank The Andersons at the Woodville Mall and their employees for their cooperation.
Rufus Wallace
Millbury


Childhood memories
To the editor: The circus was in town and I was there. It brought back memories from my childhood in the North End of Toledo.

When I was a kid, the circus grounds was on Manhattan Boulevard. The circus train stopped on Stickney Avenue where the Jeep Plant is now and moved south to Manhattan to the area where Kmart is now.

The elephants were quite a sight walking down the street. I was born on “Stickney.” I got a free ticket to the big top for helping workers with the animals. After seeing the show, I helped park cars on Manhattan, where there were not many homes then.

Later, after I got married and we had two kids, we went on many vacations. On our first trip to the Wisconsin Dells, we found Baraboo, Wis., where the circuses spent their off season.

There we found a museum, side show and a big top. You can bet we went to Baraboo on future trips to the Dells.

The next time the circus is in town, I urge you to go and have fun.
Richard Buchholz
Lambertville, MI

No results found.