The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

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To the editor: In a Toledo Blade article dated Oct. 8, Mike Seferian stated that his continued questions about Jeff Brown were not politically motivated. If that is true, then why wasn’t Jeff Brown a concern prior to the election or even last year? It’s interesting how this topic only became page-one “scandal” material just weeks before the primary election. Mr. Seferian was also quite vocal about a supposed “gag order” on former police chief Gulch, which, in theory, prevented Mr. Gulch from “exposing the truth.”

In a subsequent Blade article from Oct. 13, former Chief Gulch stated that Jeff Brown was not investigated for sexual misconduct but rather for harassing phone calls. Mr. Gulch further stated that the harassment investigation was dropped when the accuser did not return calls from the police regarding her complaint.

Yes, Mayor Brown’s son has been disciplined for several matters and, as a police officer, we as citizens would prefer he have a spotless record. But Jeff Brown is an adult and his actions, whether real or imagined, are not those of Mayor Brown.


Karla Neely
Oregon

 


People make mistakes
To the editor: Although my family has moved away from Oregon, I wanted everyone in the community to know about one enduring memory we have of this community – the compassion and kindness of Officer Jeffrey Brown of the Oregon Police Department.

Our daughter was killed in a traffic accident and it was Officer Brown who brought us the tragic news. He was a tremendously caring man to us under the most difficult of circumstances, not only on that awful day, but in subsequent days as well. He continued to follow up with our family to make sure we were OK. I am sure that there are many others who have experienced Officer Brown’s humanity as well.

I have been home visiting recently and I have been sickened at the smear campaign that is being orchestrated against Officer Brown. If he has done wrong, he should be held accountable, but the name-calling and attacks are completely unfair to a man who gave so much to me in my darkest hour.

Is this really what Oregon has become? Is this really the best the community can do? I urge everyone in the City of Oregon to remember that people make mistakes and that sometimes the good they have done far outweighs the bad.
Fran Wilber
Briston, TN


Every vote counts
To the editor: I think it is time that Jerusalem Township residents take a very close look at what is soon going to take place here in our township - the Nov. 3 vote, where we can place two votes for township trustees. It is a very important vote due to the fact that we have had nothing but trouble, arguing, lying, stealing, incredibly bad press, double standards, and the negative list goes on and on.

One of our present trustees still defends taking insurance reimbursements from your tax dollars when he already receives insurance from his employer. The other trustee who pays absolutely no tax to the township what so ever, has led a child-like campaign against our fiscal officer, Julie Van Nest and new Trustee Joe Kiss for two years. They both have not once tried to work with these two elected officials. It has been two years of total loss. This all takes place simply because their endorsed candidates failed to successfully get in office.

The township needs to head in a better direction now. It is so very important that we elect new leadership at this Nov. 3 election. This election should not be about who your neighbor is or your buddy or even who your relative is. This election should be about who is best qualified to lead and manage along with making sound business decisions. We need 3 people that will think and talk for themselves. Not one guy talking and the other just bobbing his head with approval. There is no doubt if you look at the new candidates you will see that they have far, far more experience in business, education and township residency than our present trustees.      

If you like the image that our township has gotten then keep what we got. If you want to improve our situation and image then it is a very clear decision. Please vote for new leadership on Nov. 3. Your vote really does count.
Jay Loar


Grateful for support
We want to give a big thank you to the businesses and individuals for their generous contributions to our recent marathon held at Maumee Bay State Park to raise awareness about the dangers of melanoma.

Among the supporters were Mercy Health Partners, Maumee Bay State Park, Collingwood Water, Culligan Water, Cutting Edge Hair Studio, Future Wave – Aveda, Chippewa Golf Club, Cousino’s, Bethel United Brethren Church – Elmore; Barry Bagels, Belle Tire, Bennett Management, Bob Evans – Northwood, Flaherty Sales Co., Genoa Chevrolet, Genoa Ford, Holiday Inn Express, Kroger, Miller’s New Market, Mr. Emblem, Marsha’s Buckeyes, Meijer – Oregon, Party Lite (Peggy Gomez), Pinks Sweet Treats (Barb Pinkelman), Peggy Sears, Red Bull (Buckeye Distribution), Ryan’s Barber Shop, Sheri Gentry (USANA), Sonic, Toledo Mud Hens, Toledo Symphony, Tim Horton’s, Wal-Mart and William and Luann Reif.
Eleanor Riffle
Cindy Pickett


Supporting seniors
To the editor: The Riverview Nursing Home Auxiliary has been a support to the residents of the Ottawa County Riverview Nursing Home for many years. We have participated in many resident centered activities such as birthday parties, Christmas presents for the residents and flowers for Mother’s and Father’s Day, to name a few. Also, we annually offer $1,000 scholarships to a Riverview employee.

On or before Nov. 3, you will have an opportunity to vote on Issue 4, a .5 mill levy for maintenance and operation of the Riverview Nursing Home. There had been a .5 mill levy in effect for many years, up until its defeat in November of 2008. We, the members of the Riverview Auxiliary, respectfully ask for support for this issue. Your support of Issue 4 will allow for the Riverview Nursing Home to continue to serve its residents and be a facility that the residents of Ottawa County can continue to be very proud.

Please join us in voting yes on Issue 4.
Jan Willoughby
Vice President, Riverview Nursing Home Auxiliary
Oak Harbor


No other choice
To the editor: We know the importance of great education. Woodmore has a super staff that makes the most of the current facilities, but that isn’t enough. We need a new building that is safer, energy efficient, and technologically up to date.

The estimated cost of the new pre-K-8 building is $21,965,139. Ohio School Facilities Commission (OSFC) will fund 29 percent ($6,369,890). The new building will be 108,000 square feet. November is the district’s only chance to be guaranteed money from the State. If the issue fails, OSFC will release our funds to another district and Woodmore will not be guaranteed funds, therefore, responsible for the entire cost.

There will be $3,900,000 locally funded initiatives (LFI’s) to fund 4 additional classrooms and a Performing Arts Center. These additions are not included in the 108,000 square footage. The total estimated cost would be $25,865,139. The cost will be less if bids come in lower like they have at other schools. Some are receiving bids at 25-45 percent of OSFC’s estimate. If that happens, the most commonly chosen option by other districts is upgrading flooring, roofing, and furnishings. Some districts have decided to pay more towards the annual debt so the issue is paid off sooner.

The millage will be 6.97 plus a 0.50 mill maintenance levy required by OSFC. When the issue passes, the board has committed to reducing 1 mill of the current permanent improvement levy. The net effect of the new building will be 6.47 mills. This equates to $198.14 on a house valued at $100,000.

It is difficult to continue asking the community for money, but schools are left with no other choice. Communities around us are building facilities to accommodate the needs of today’s education.

Let’s not leave Woodmore behind.
Jane Garling
Woodmore Superintendent


Paying the price
To the editor: On Nov. 3, voters in Elmore and Woodville will be asked to approve a levy to build a new elementary building in Woodville.

I have been a member of the elementary staff for the last 14 years. Every time the weatherman calls for rain, we worry that the first floor/basement will flood. Just to be clear, our basement isn’t a storage facility but houses preschool, art, computer and all the second grade classes.

Outside of the flooding issue, our school is just plain old.

The stairs are dangerous due to being worn down in the middle, replaced floor tiles don’t fit right and restrooms are inadequate including one floor that has none at all. 

The interior electrical wiring is from a different age when chalkboards were the standard means to teach students. Technology is the wave of the future but we find ourselves not being able to provide what our students need to compete in today’s world. 

Heating is another issue. Every year we waste money because in order to keep some classrooms barely warm other classrooms have windows open to prevent students from sweltering in the heat, even in the heart of winter.

To maintain our building is costing us a lot. To build a new school would also cost money. The question then becomes, do we continue to spend money putting a Band-Aid on a building that will only get worse and cost us more? Or, do we take the state up on it’s offer to help pay for a new building that will not only take us far into the 21st century but will also give our students, our children a healthier school environment and a better chance to compete in today’s world.

The choice is up to you. Make no mistake, one way or another we will pay the price.
Julie Coon
Computer Aide, Woodmore Elementary School
President, OAPSE Local 676


Can we afford it?
To the editor: I would like the Obama health care plan to protect that hard-working couple who run into a serious health problem that may cost them tens of thousands of dollars. If they are without health insurance, it would wipe out a lifetime of work.

I have been to most area hospitals and I can tell you that every afternoon, you can find people there who have no money and no health insurance, and yet, they are taken care of.

I pointed out to one of my daughters that national health insurance is in use in Canada and Europe and there are many faults with it. There are long waits to get a needed operation. If you are over 72 and need a life-saving operation, they figure that you contribute nothing to society anymore so they give you pain pills and send you home to die.

My daughter shouted at me, “This is not Europe, this is the U. S. of A.”

Two weeks ago, I had my regular doctor check-up and my doctor told me that we seniors over the age of 64 will not be eligible to get the swine flu shot. What did you say, daughter?

Social Security is going broke. Medicare is going broke. The post office is going broke. We are in hock up to our ears to the Japanese and Chinese. Can we afford a national health care system? What do you think?
Louis Agoston
Toledo


Laws not effective
To the editor: Let me get this straight. We have four women raped in Baltimore, Md. The police are called three times. The Supreme Court says the police don’t have to protect you.

We have a Wild West shoot-out at the Route 66 Bar and there are no police around. Toledo’s mayor now wants to shut the bar down because the owner cannot keep his patrons under control. This from a man who runs red lights.

This mayor also said that with concealed carry, there would be shoot-outs on the streets of Toledo. Well, we have shoot-outs, but not by concealed carry people, but by those who would flaunt the law. The government says they will take care of us and so they pass a bunch of laws. But as you can see, the laws are not worth the paper they are printed on.

So when a politician tells you that they will take care of you or that they will fix it, you can be sure what they mean is that they are looking out for themselves.
Rufus Wallace
Millbury


Pay for your own
To the editor: Concerning Al Kapustar’s letter to the editor, isn’t it ironic that Al mocks and belittles the very people he demands pay for his health care.

His beloved government has caused the health care problem, the housing problem, the education problem, the immigration problem.

Pay for your own health care, Al.
Michael Preest
Clay Center 


Lack of concern?
To the editor: On Thursday, Oct. 15, the Clay High School AP Government Class helped sponsor a community forum to meet the school board candidates.

As part of the program, they contacted all school board, city council, and mayoral candidates, asking them to respond to questions about key issues. Their answers would be published in a candidate voter's guide to be distributed at the program.

Candidates who did not respond by the deadline were personally contacted by the students via phone to give them a
last chance to respond. Neither mayoral candidate responded to the original request. My daughter was responsible for contacting Mike Seferian.

After she clearly identified herself and the purpose of the call, Mr. Seferian responded, “I'm busy, I don’t have time to talk to a high school student” and immediately hung up on her. The instructor noticed the rather stunned look on her face and asked her what had happened, so this was a witnessed event.

It’s nice to know that Mr. Seferian doesn’t have time for the only public high school in Oregon. Mr. Seferian also seems to have forgotten three key facts: 1) All high school students are future voters. 2) Many senior high school students will be voting for the first time this November. 3) All of the students have parents/caregivers as well as teachers and school administrators, who are potential voters, including this parent.

Be assured Mr. Seferian, your response and lack of concern for students did not go unnoticed.

Many thanks to Kathleen Pollauf, Dennis Walendzak, Sandy Bihn, William Myers, Richard Gabel, Diana Gadus, Carol-Ann Molnar and Jeff Ziviski, who did repond to the students’ questions.
Julie Stausmire
Oregon

Editor’s note: Mr. Seferian said at the time he was contacted by the student concerning the questionnaire, he was in the recovery room with his son, who had just had surgery. He said he told the student he had some confusion about the questionnaire – he wasn’t sure mayoral candidates needed to submit responses because the students’ forum was for school board candidates. He said he also told the student he wasn’t sure he could meet the deadline, but the questions and issues raised would be discussed at the upcoming mayoral debate.

Mr. Seferian also said he did not hang up on the student, and speculated that perhaps his cell phone service was interrupted because he was in the hospital. He added that he apologizes if he offended the student and her classmates in any way.


One-sided
To the editor: Coming up at our next voting time is an issue about whether or not a large gaming company from Pennsylvania should be allowed to build and operate a gambling casino in four Ohio cities. Think about this issue. Here are some thoughts about this proposal.

Why only four cities in Ohio?

Why only one company?

Why deprive other companies the same opportunity to do the same?

Does this sound like another big lobby company has promised payoffs to certain people in the state house if this issue passes?

I thought in America all citizens have the same rights – not just people with lobbying power. Why can’t anyone in Ohio have the same right to build a casino here? The big boys say no – just certain companies with friends in high places. Do they think we are stupid?

Why not, if gambling is accepted in Ohio, can’t we allow all and any business owners to have a couple of slot machines in their places of business? Think about this idea – thousands of owners would benefit from this. The owners all over the state would not only bring in more people, and so much more money than just four casinos. If this were the case, the payoff to state big boys could not take place. We’re sure they wouldn’t approve of that!!

The small business owners with slot machines in their places of business could payout 60 percent of the profits to the County’s Board of Education and the remaining 40% they, the owners, would keep as a profit. That seems fair to me.

What a way to finance the local school systems instead of putting this extreme burden on taxpayers - especially the elderly who have worked all their lives to hopefully have enough monies to sit back and enjoy the remainder of their lives. Why should people who have paid school taxes their whole lives have to take on the same burden that they have done for fifty years or so. Elderly folks who don’t have a pension from their workplace are forgotten.

Every employer in America has not been able to furnish a pension to their workers - especially those who run small businesses. Take a look at the past twenty years as pension go. Workers were told to invest their retirement monies in the stock market. Turns out, that was a great idea! How many of us lost most of what we put away for our retirement years. Now what?

“Tax us some more” is the echo coming from our politician friends who are so concerned about our welfare. Small business owners and operators make up the majority of employers in this country. Don’t believe this. Look it up on your computer, if you can afford one.

Public TV reported that for every senator and congressman, there are at least ten lobbyists per person in Washington. Shouldn’t our government outlaw this activity? Why should our officials be swayed by these groups to promote their wants and needs . No one should be allowed to give senators and congressmen gifts and favors for the sole purpose of obtaining votes to promote any causes. This is an issue that should be declared illegal and a crime. This not only occurs in the federal government but also in the state and local governments. How sad.

“Of the people, by the people, and for the people” – what people?

P.S. I am in favor of casinos in Ohio – especially Toledo – just not the one-sided way they propose!
Larry Erard
Oregon