The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

The Press celebrates its 40th anniversary this month. Once a month until the end of the year, I will take you on a short trip through The Press archives.
 
The exits on The Nostalgia Highway are at 10 year increments. Enjoy the trip.

April 2002
News: Dave Gallaher, Northwood council president, announced the city and VFW Post 2984 will sell paver bricks to raise $25,000 for a veterans’ memorial.
 
Ashley Spitler, a Lake student who caddied four years at Inverness Country Club, was awarded a $100,000 Chick Evans Scholarship for college.
 
Rex Damschroder, Ohio State Representative from Fremont, sponsored a bill to provide a moment of silence in the public schools for prayer.
 
The City of Toledo and the Toledo Lucas County Port Authority applied to the Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund for $3 million to remediate the site of the $191 million Marina District project. The new arena was scheduled to be the first stage, according to Jim Mettler, Port Authority spokesperson.
 
Sports: The Gibsonburg Golden Bears softball team looked to defend the state title it won in 2001 under first-year coach Erika Foster…Clay High School’s baseball team celebrated its 1,000 win, the most wins in Ohio for a high school team. The school, under only three coaches—Karl Knierim, Dick Kandik and Harold Potter, had a record of 1,000-483.

Hot then, gone today: GenTec Computers, Genoa; Value City Furniture, Great Eastern; Mel Berman’s Restaurant, Oregon.

April 1992
News: Press reporter Sharon Gaich wrote about an AIDS specialist from St. Charles Hospital who sent out 2,000 flyers promoting a talk about the disease to a local rural community. No one came. That surprised the specialist as 14 AIDS-related deaths had been reported in Sandusky, Wood and Ottawa Counties, according to the Ohio Department of Health.
 
Ron Johns of Millbury leased his 1927 Chevy one-ton truck to 20th Century Fox. The Hollywood movie company was in Detroit filming the movie “Hoffa” under the direction of Danny DeVito.
 
The Regional/Urban Design Assistance Team, a group of engineers and urban planners, visited Wood County to study the Golden Triangle for development. The land is bounded by I-75, S.R. 795 and the Ohio Turnpike.
 
It was expected Jobst would move its headquarters from East Toledo to North Carolina causing an annual loss to the City of Toledo of $270,000 in tax revenue.

 
Hot then, gone today: Spieldenner Carpets, Fremont; Russell’s Tuxedo’s and Fiesta Hair & Tanning Salon, Woodville Mall; The $1.98 Store, Oregon.

Price Check: Walbridge Market sold whole boneless hams for $1.39 lb.; Toledo Five Restaurant offered an 8 oz. prime rib dinner with au jus for $6.99 and you could golf nine at Collins Park for $6.50.

April 1982
News: The Ottawa County Commissioners, Community Planning Council of Northwest Ohio and other community groups met in Oak Harbor to brainstorm solutions to the county’s unemployment rate of 18.5 percent.
 
Roy Cherry, Eastwood superintendent, told the board of education it should eliminate 10 classroom positions, five library aides and five reading aides due to a $180,000 cut in state funding. The positions paid $4 an hour.

Hot then, gone today: King Liquidators, Northwood; Yankee Pedlar, Genoa; The Original Pancake House,  Woodville Road; Circle A Ranch, Millbury; Toledo Box & Lumber, East Toledo; Elmore Lumber Yard, Elmore.

Price Check: Red Carpet Mohon Realty offered a three-bedroom, aluminum sided ranch in Walbridge for the low $50s and 12 percent interest; Kirwin’s Supermarket, Gibsonburg, sold a 2-lb. can of Maxwell House coffee for $4.99; Genoa SuperValu sold ground beef, 73 percent lean, for 99 cents lb.

April 1972
News: The Woodville Jaycees raised $1,800 to purchase a “drug dog”—one of only two in Northwest Ohio. They loaned the dog to the Woodville Police Department.
 
The Genoa Library installed a coin-operated copy machine “on an experimental basis.”
 
Douthit Communications, then known as Photojournal Press, published the first issue of The Suburban Press on April 4. It was dedicated to Bob Levee, who in 1958 published the Seaway Shopper. The Shopper was Levee’s dream to connect the communities from Oregon and Northwood to Genoa, Oak Harbor and Gibsonburg. Some called this area “no man’s land”, but Levee saw “a fairly homogenous and closely related area,” one where families from East Toledo and Oregon tended to move east rather than west over the Maumee River.
 
Levee was a Photojournal print customer, but lacked the resources to keep his paper going. When he ceased publication he wrote, “Mark my words I’m going to revive my paper before long and it’ll be a success. I bowl, fish and smoke a pipe and I hope all of this means that I can’t be all bad.”
 
Rick Hemmer, 24, whose father Dick Hemmer owned the Avon Lake Press, was named manager. The office was located in Genoa. Initial circulation was 13,000. Hemmer wrote in the first issue, “There will be problems to face, but we’ll tackle them in a whole-hearted, honest manner.”
 
Price check: Spurgeon Chevrolet offered a Chevy Vega Custom Coupe for $2,295; Genoa Motors, which held its grand opening for it new showroom on Route 51 following its move from downtown Genoa, offered a Ford Pinto wagon for $2,265.

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Bill Cosby

In your opinion, do the allegations against Bill Cosby have any credibility?
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