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Home Opinions/Columns Page 2 Chinese investors generate the most Quotes of the Year for 2011
Chinese investors generate the most Quotes of the Year for 2011
Written by John Szozda   
Thursday, 05 January 2012 16:32

Here are my choices for Quotes of the Year from those who made the pages of the Press in 2011:

“The idea is to preserve the classroom. We’re not trying to cause hardship on parents. We’re trying to make sure we educate their children.”
Diana Karoly, president, Oregon school board, on eliminating busing for Clay High due to budget constraints.

“My biggest fear now is if gas goes to $5 per gallon. Jeep won’t be selling SUVs and, if Jeep’s not working, I’ll have three plants in Northwood not working again. Even if gas goes to $4 per gallon, that will affect the city’s budget. We still have to run the police cars, run the plows, have to mow grass, and fire trucks still have to roll.”
Mark Stoner, Northwood mayor.

“If people take the time to really look at Toledo, there is a lot to offer here. Great location for manufacturing, and just a great location — we’re on a lake, we’ve got a river. You probably can’t find open riverfront property in any Chinese city. I’ll tell you, it’s kind of sad to hear in the media a lot people running down the city and nothing ever is right here. That’s just not the case.”
Mike Craig, East Toledo councilman, saying the Chinese investors who bought The Docks see opportunity where Toledoans do not.

“Whether it’s the Chinese or someone from California, when people outside the region come here they are astounded by all we have in this city. It’s the people who have lived here their whole life who always want to hammer Toledo. Do some traveling—you’ll find out how nice this city is.”
Dean Monske, Toledo deputy mayor, on how the Chinese perceive our community.

“These people are individuals just like you and I looking for the same things that you and I have—the freedom to come here to invest dollars to protect their wealth and to bring their families to a free country. They view us as a warm and friendly community…There’s no reason we can’t benefit from those looking to bring wealth to our community.”
Brad Peebles, commissioner of the department of development for the City of Toledo, commenting to the Eastern Maumee Bay Chamber of Commerce about Chinese investors buying The Docks.
 
“They are going to be selling Toledo, Ohio from China.”
Brad Peebles, on Chinese investment in The Marina District.

“Government can’t stay the same. We can’t keep tagging the taxpayer for a larger percent of our resources. We can do this more efficiently. We can deliver the same services for less cost…We need to find ways to work cooperatively while maintaining local control.”
Mike Beazley, Oregon city administrator, talking to the members of the Eastern Maumee Bay Chamber of Commerce.

“To tell you the truth, I never really knew too much about Toledo or Oregon. I’ve passed through here. But I think the area has more going for it than Dayton ever dreamed of having. There’re more things to do here. There’s more recreation. People take more advantage of the Maumee River. Nothing wrong with Dayton, but Oregon has been a breath of fresh air.”
Mike Rausch, general manager of P&R Communications Service, a Dayton company that recently opened a location in Oregon. 

“I think it’s a call for everyone to call on their state representatives. We need an answer—yes or no—protect, plunder, frolic, or flack — what are these parks in for?”
Trent Dougherty, staff attorney for the Ohio Environmental Council, on drilling for gas and oil in Ohio State Parks.
 
“What Kasich is doing is simply transferring the tax burden from the state to the local level. And I fail to see how that will make our local communities more competitive for economic and industrial development. All we’ve heard on the campaign trail last year was that his focus would be on job creation, yet all we’ve seen so far is a concentrated attack on worker’s rights, both through Senate Bill 5 and his budget proposal.”
Matt Szollosi, state representative.

“If you learn not to be ashamed, it’s better for you. When you’re ashamed, you don’t want people to see you. You don’t want people to notice you can’t read. It’s a problem. You should face it and go on and get it out there.”
John Boose, 62, high school drop out, who has spent five years learning how to read in the Adult Read for Literacy program.

“There’s emergency vehicles going up and down the side of my house on Curtice Road at all hours of the day and night, but I heard absolute silence that morning. We’ve lived in this community, we’ve paid taxes in this community, and we love this community. Why do you have to call three times to get someone to save your loved one? I just don’t understand that.”
Ellen Mix, telling Northwood council she had to wait 28 minutes for a response to her 9-1-1 call. Her husband, Tim, died two days later at Mercy St. Vincent Hospital.

“He still misses his mom. He’s too young to understand her death is permanent...For Christmas, he thought he wanted an airplane. He said to his Dad, `But ‘Daddy, I don’t want a little airplane. I need a big one that you and I can get in so we can get Mommy.’ His vision is that she’s up there and I need to get to her…What do you do? With a mind that small, they think of all sorts of things that make sense to them.”
Kirk Lathrop, Gerald Lathrop’s grandfather, on how his grandson is adapting to life one year after his mother, Bailey Bowman, was killed in the June 5th, 2010 tornado.

“I thanked him for saving our jobs. I don’t believe the Republicans were going to do that…There would have been hundreds of thousands of people out of work without the bailout. We would have nothing for the kids who do not go to college to go to work. Where would we be?”
Richard Sheets of Oregon recalling what he told President Barack Obama when he toured the Jeep Plant.

“Out of inadvertent humor can come great deeds.”
E. Gordon Gee, president of The Ohio State University, on a visit to the Little Sisters of the Poor to apologize for saying Non-BCS teams like Boise State shouldn’t play for the national championship in college football because they play teams like Little Sisters of the Poor.
 
“They’re seizing it from us. It’s highway robbery.”
James Seaman, Oregon councilman, on Governor John Kasich’s plan to lease the Ohio Turnpike to a private entity.

“Ignorance is the biggest hurdle in mutual acceptance and understanding. Anyone can cherry-pick passages in both The Bible and The Koran to vilify someone else’s religion.”
Dr. S. Amjad Hussain, professor emeritus at the University of Toledo, urging people of different faiths to get to know one another better.

“The situation in Lake Erie with the algae is becoming more and more grave. There’re a lot of newspaper articles that refer to Lake Erie as dying again. Obviously, that can impact the treatment cost for water intake, it can affect the economy of the lake and economy of the region.”
Sandy Bihn, Lake Erie water-keeper and Oregon councilwoman.

“There’s always a kiss in the morning and a kiss at night and a ‘I love you’”
Bonnie Kreager, Oak Harbor, on one secret to her 60-year marriage to husband Don.

“Why not restore busing first? This is a safety issue. We got kids walking to school on busy roads. That’s not good. The board put raises ahead of our children’s safety. The board showed us the truth of what they believe in. I believe that’s greed, money, tax levies, not our children.”
Mike Wegrzyn, Oregon resident, on the Oregon school board giving administrators a raise.

“The education of our kids is the most important thing. And we did that by renewing the teachers’ contract. Then we took care of the leaders of the school district. Now that we’ve gone through this, we look forward to start working together with the community.”
Eric Heintschel, Oregon school board president, defending wage hikes for administrators.

“I shot every last one of them on my property to restore all the native wildlife to proper balance. This is even a more humane method than terrorizing, trapping and animal-shelter methods; and why it is the preferred feral-cat management policy in so many areas today. One moment the cats are happily stalking defenseless animals to cruelly torture again, the next they are dead and don't even know what happened.”
A post on The Press website by “Woodsman” regarding a story on the feral cat problem.
 
“My question to those who want to catch and kill all feral cats is: Who is going to do this? When towns already have budget shortfalls? Just from an economic standpoint it makes sense to allow over 1,000 feral cat groups in the country to continue with TNR (Trap, Neuter and Release), as they have been doing for many years, with their own money.”
A post on the website by Louise Holton.

“I'm definitely not happy about my career winning percentage or wins, but I did learn so much from high school football and sports in general. You also play to be with other people, to learn to integrate with coaches. High school football builds your character and makes you a man. It makes you accountable for your actions.”
Jon Sandwisch, Woodmore senior quarterback, on not regretting his high school career which saw his teams go 9-21 record over three years.

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