The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

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Let’s give the last word of 2012 to those who made the pages of The Press.

“Property crimes, I know to you, are important. I’ve got homicides I can’t solve because people won’t tell me what’s going on in the neighborhoods. We have drug dealings everywhere…If you see it happening, you’ve got to report it.

“I’ve got a manpower problem and I’ve got to utilize the manpower the best I can. Don’t wait until the next community meeting to talk to the police officers about what is going in your neighborhood. Tell them about it now.”

Derrick Diggs, Toledo Police chief, speaking to a group of Birmingham Neighborhood residents.
***

“When we had these 18 colleges all kind of floating around, they were like PT Boats, they were shooting each other. It was kind of like the Polish army or something.”

E. Gordon Gee, president, The Ohio State University, attempting to explain the difficulty in coordinating OSU’s 18 colleges.
***

“I just decided for me personally there was no doubt in my mind that I would rather be on the front end trying to help somebody than being the guy that comes and sees this child (a 13-year-old boy who hung himself). If this child had one positive influence, perhaps they would have gone to that person instead of taking such a desperate step. For me personally, that was my conviction, and once I realized that, there was no stopping me.”

Nathan Wolf, pastor of Echo Meadows Church of Christ in Oregon, on why he quit the Anchorage, Alaska police force to become a minister.
***

“When you come from an abusive family, you don’t know anything about unconditional love. That’s the one thing animals are really good at. They will love you no matter what. As long as you treat them well, they will be your devoted friends for life.”

Kelly Meister, Walbridge’s Critter Lady, on her love of animals.
***

“In three years, when we’re cutting all these teachers’ jobs and bus drivers’ jobs, and we’re cutting everyone to pieces again, we’re all going to forget about today. This is definitely something that should have been discussed by this board ahead of time to give our residents, who we work for, the right to ask questions. This is exactly what’s wrong with this board. I’m adamantly against locking our district into millions of dollars in contracts, knowing we’re going to be in negative money.”

P.J. Kapfhammer, Oregon City Schools’ board member, on the board voting 3-2 to renew administrator contracts one and half years early.
***

“How we got it in our contracts where we’re paying an administrator to go watch his kid’s basketball game? Take one for the team, guys. Don’t submit miles for it. If we’re really going broke…if it’s this dire, before we talk levies, before we stick it to the community, I would love to sit down and see how we could save money as a board, so the community doesn’t have to give as much.”

P.J. Kapfhammer, Oregon school board member, criticizing the board for paying mileage to an administrator who attended his child’s basketball game.
***

“You might as well have a Christmas club account as opposed to buying a maternity coverage plan. The new plans are going to be mandated to have that (maternity benefits)… It’s going to make it unaffordable. They are going to stay on Mom and Dad’s insurance until they’re 26 or 28. Then, they’re going to go to COBRA…It’s going to be more advantageous for them to not get married…That’s the way they’re going to get that maternity and childbirth covered...So they’re going to find the guy of their dreams, move in with the guy of their dreams while staying on Mommy and Daddy’s policy. They’re going to have their children. They’re going to on COBRA because now they can take the man of their dreams, put them on COBRA and stay on Mom and Dad’s policy for three more years because they are aging out, so now we have a 31-year-old on Mommy and Daddy’s policy in the State of Ohio.”

Barbara Sears, Republican assistant majority floor leader for the Ohio House of Representatives on one potential effect of the Affordable Care Act.
***

“I was involved in a lot of different (organizations) at Woodmore. It made me better-rounded. I think growing up at Woodmore High was wonderful for my life journey, especially in a small school (where) the student body is involved in a lot of different things.”

Jon Waters, director of the Ohio State Marching Band, The Best Damn Band in the Land.
***

“All right I’m going to eat my burger. And, everybody just pretend like I’m not here.”

President Barack Obama, talking to diners at Kozy Corners Restaurant in Oak Harbor where he stopped by for a surprise visit on his way from Maumee to Sandusky.
***

“The Asian Carp would gobble up the food that walleye, yellow perch and bass eat. Without food, these key sport fish would rapidly dwindle. The silver carp like the sound of boat motors and leap when they hear them. In the Mississippi (River), boaters wear helmets to avoid getting hit by the flying fish. While it would probably take decades for the Asian Carp to have this devastating impact, once and if the Asian Carp establish in Lake Erie, the flying fish would pose a threat to Lake Erie boaters.”

Sandy Bihn, executive director for Lake Erie Waterkeeper and Oregon councilperson, on hearing Asian Carp DNA was found in Lake Erie.
***

“Some people might not like to hear this, but my contention is if we farm everything out and we lose manufacturing in the United States — if we go to a big war do you think China and some of these Asian companies are going to ship us parts and help us fight? During World War II, most of the wives and women ran the tool shops, die shops, and machine shops to make military parts for the war. Well, if we don’t have any shops here, what would we do?”

Paul Faykosh, owner of Centaur Tool & Die in Bowling Green, commenting on losing tool and die and manufacturing shops in America.
***

“They are almost like performers, and I don’t think it contributes to the dialogue like we are having right here. It is dissatisfying to the American people and they are spending all this money. Ohioans should have questions answered about Ohio, rather than listening to all these canned speeches both sides give.

Marcy Kaptur, U.S. Congressman, on the 2012 presidential election.
***

“It was not a great location, but it was not in the condition it is in today. We never had a huge return at that location, although it helped our financial performance. Frankly, somebody has to pay for all of this stuff. There is not the demographic density to make sense of keeping a location open there.”

Dan Anderson, president of The Andersons Retail Group, on pulling out of the Eastern Maumee Bay market after 24 years.
***

“The Andersons were there because the mall owners gave them the spot cheaply--$10,000 per month in rent--to help draw people to the mall itself. I don’t think anybody could have done anything. There is no one to blame. When it opened, it was state-of-the-art and a hopping place. Then the mall became obsolete.”

Mike Seferian, Oregon mayor,
***

“The demographics are not there yet. We can’t go from a city of 20,000 to 40,000 overnight. We don’t want them to come to Oregon and not be successful. We don’t want a store to come in and fail. We want stores like Kohl’s and Target to come when they can be successful here. We could not afford to have them close up. We have to be in shape to handle what comes our way. The stores would also strain city services. Without additional business and industry to help with those costs, we would be sunk.”

Mike Seferian, Oregon mayor, on attracting a major retailer.
***

“Heartbroken. Sad thing is this side of the river didn’t give up on Andersons, but they sure gave up on us. Poor management of the Woodville Mall, Northwood, and Woodville Road, and most importantly, poor management of The Andersons retail division…The Andersons could have moved to Oregon and kept its “East Side” store profitable and avoided this closing. Navarre Avenue has so much more to offer and would have been ideal. It’s not like the city of Oregon hasn’t tried. So sad.”

Jeannine Burgess Czop, a Press reader who said Andersons should have stuck it out longer
***

“Teamwork, time management, ethical leadership and the ability to think quickly, process and make decisions...I apply something I learned through athletics every day of my life. I will always function in teams--with family, co-workers, and friends--and call on the guiding principles that I first learned as a female athlete...because someone/something gave me the opportunity to play sports. Thank you to my mentors and thank you Title IX”

Kris Livingston, former Lake basketball and Division I college player and current administrator for the University of Colorado commenting on the 40th anniversary of Title IX, the federal law that brought gender equality to sports.
***

“Anybody that is involved in a team sport gets something out of it. You learn to work as a team. You learn to share. There are some things that you don’t really like to do … but you do it for the team. It’s not always about fun. You learn to push through it. Face it, everything in life doesn’t always go the way you want it to.”

Amy Sander, former Genoa Comet basketball player on the effect of playing sports.

Trick or Treat

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