biggestweek2014cover
MedDirCover
HousingHeaderSmall
EMBCCover 

 linkedinfacebooktwitter

WTOLLogo1

Home Opinions/Columns Earth Talk
Earth Talk
EarthTalk®
Written by From the Editors of E/The Environmental Magazine   
Monday, 07 December 2009 14:25

Dear EarthTalk: What is the status of the hyena in the wild? Though unloved by

earthtalkhyenas

"The striped hyena and the brown hyena
are both
considered “near threatened” by
the International Union for the Conservation
of Nature, which maintains a “Red List” of
at-risk and extinct species around the
world. The spotted hyena, pictured here, is
doing well comparatively, but its population
is also declining, primarily due to habitat loss.
Ikiwaner, courtesy Wikipedia.

many, the hyena has always struck me as one of God’s survivors.     -- Jim Reddoch, Portland, TX

 

 

Among the most intelligent animals on Earth, three species of hyenas still roam in wilder parts of Africa and Asia. Of them, the striped hyena and the brown hyena are most at risk. Both are considered “Near Threatened” by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), which maintains a “Red List” of at-risk and extinct species around the world. The spotted hyena is doing well enough to be considered of “Least Concern” by IUCN, but its population is also declining, primarily due to habitat loss.

 
EarthTalk®
Written by From the Editors of E/The Environmental Magazine   
Monday, 30 November 2009 10:21

 

Dear EarthTalk: Wouldn’t a return to installing bidets in bathrooms at home go a

earthtalkbidet

long way toward cutting disposable tissue use and saving forests?     -- Peter K., Albany, GA

Besides being more sanitary than toilet tissue, bidets—those squirty accessories so popular in Europe, Japan and elsewhere that clean your underside using a jet of water—are also much less stressful on the environment than using paper.

Justin Thomas, editor of the website metaefficient.com, considers bidets to be “a key green technology” because they eliminate the use of toilet paper. According to his analysis, Americans use 36.5 billion rolls of toilet paper every year, representing the pulping of some 15 million trees. Says Thomas: “This also involves 473,587,500,000 gallons of water to produce the paper and 253,000 tons of chlorine for bleaching.” He adds that manufacturing requires about 17.3 terawatts of electricity annually and that significant amounts of energy and materials are used in packaging and in transportation to retail outlets.

 
EarthTalk®
Written by the Editors of E/The Environmental Magazine   
Tuesday, 24 November 2009 14:20

Dear EarthTalk: Can you enlighten on the environmental impact of the fashion

earthtalkfashion

The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that
one-quarter of all pesticides used nationwide go
toward growing cotton, primarily for the clothing
industry. Photo aMartin LaBar, courtesy Flickr.

industry? As I understand it, the industry overall is no friend to the environment.  -- Tan Cheng Li, Malaysia

 

According to the non-profit Earth Pledge, today some 8,000 synthetic chemicals are used throughout the world to turn raw materials into textiles. Domestically, the U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that one-quarter of all pesticides used nationwide go toward growing cotton, primarily for the clothing industry. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency considers many domestic textile manufacturing facilities to be hazardous waste generators; and lax standards and enforcement in developing countries, where the majority of textiles are produced, means that untold amounts of pollution are likely being deposited into local soils and waterways in regions that can hardly stand further environmental insult.

 
<< Start < Prev 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 Next > End >>

Page 76 of 86

Polls

If you found a penny on the floor, would you pick it up?
 

The Current Weather for Millbury, OH USA

Login




Log in