The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

Matthew Tylicki has led quite a life since he graduated from Cardinal Stritch Catholic High School. In fact, Tylicki did more things in a 20 year span than most people get to do in a lifetime.

The 1986 graduate has been all over the world, spending time in the Mediterranean, Latin America, Europe, Asia and various places in the United States; even living on the island of Sicily for two years. And though he currently does advanced work for Lockheed Martin– one of the leading companies in the technology world – many people gravitate toward the fact he has worked for the White House Military Office, supporting the Office of the President of the United States for multiple years.

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Mayor Mike Seferian said the city is reluctant to issue citations to property owners for not shoveling their sidewalks following a heavy snowfall because some are unable to keep up with city plows covering them back up again.

Councilman James Seaman at a council meeting on Monday said he had received complaints from some residents about blocked sidewalks after the most recent snow storm.

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Former Genoa High School and Bowling Green State University basketball standout Simone Eli still looks the same, but her vocabulary has changed somewhat.

“I say ‘y’all’ in every sentence,” she said. “That was one of the first things I picked up on, and saying, ‘yes, ma’am’ and ‘no, ma’am.’ ”

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Northwood City Council at its last council meeting approved a $750,000 bond for the demolition of the Woodville Mall.

The bond is twice the amount that would be required for a contractor to complete the work, Law Director Brian Ballenger told council at a meeting on Jan. 9.

“That way, if they stop, there will be enough to finish the job,” he said.

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Asian carp are voracious eaters that can wipe out native fish, and experts say if the carp make their way into Lake Erie it would wreak havoc on the ecosystem and economy.

For years, conservationists and national leaders have examined ways to stop the spread of the invasive species, which has established itself in the Mississippi River.

A study released this week from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers outlines eight possible approaches, including a physical barrier.

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