The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

The Lake Board of Education has adopted a plan to fund the cost of maintaining the turf at the stadium and all-weather track at the campus on Lemoyne Road for the next 10 years.

The board Wednesday approved the formation of a “turf and track fund” with the goal of minimizing the use of tax dollars, said Tim Krugh, board president.

Under the plan, volunteer organizations and the board will combine efforts to raise money for the facilities over the next 10 years.

Genoa is a quiet village. Not much noise and not much big news. So rarely does it ever make national or world news. It has happened, but not often. The deadly tornado in 1920 and the sensational bank robbery nearly a century ago when a druggist was shot to death, are two of the town’s biggest stories. But, perhaps the biggest story that sent ripples beyond its village borders is one that few people today have read. It was a story so gripping that if it were to occur today, Genoa would likely have to endure a crush of TV crews and cameras all crowding each other to get the scoop. But, there were no TV cameras back in the mid-1800s, just newspapers, and while they did report this story, its notoriety has faded along with the ink of the old news print. The roots of this curious tale began to unfold in 1867 in Sandusky with the kidnapping of a three-year old girl named Marie Lilly Bowers.

It's another milestone for Tom Kashmer, Research Coordinator of Sandusky County Park District.

In 2010, Kashmer banded his 100,000th bird, a feat accomplished by very few individuals around the country.

Kashmer has now reached a unique place in history when an Indigo Bunting crossed his path on September 28, 2013 at Creek Bend Farm in Lindsey,. The bird was a “recap”, meaning it had already been captured, recorded, banded and released. What makes this unique is that it was previously banded in 2001. It was estimated to have hatched in 2000.

The Oregon school board on Tuesday approved a plan that helps make up school days that were cancelled due to the harsh winter weather in the 2013-14 school year.

The Ohio Legislature for weeks had debated whether or not to allow additional calamity days for school districts because most have exhausted the legal five day allotment. The Legislature finally passed legislation last week that granted four more days.

“We put together a plan as soon as we had word that it had passed,” said Superintendent Lonny Rivera. “We had many ideas for a number of weeks, then we were actually happy to get this moving.”

The plan calls for the school day to be extended by half an hour at Clay High School, Fassett Junior High School and Eisenhower Intermediate School. .

Oregon City Schools Superintendent Lonny Rivera wants to boost the private fundraising potential in the district to help support educational programs.

“We can’t do everything through taxpayer dollars,” said Rivera at a school board meeting on Tuesday. “What I really want to do is try and find a way that we can make the experience second to none for our kids. And one of the ways that we are going to do that is to tap into the private resources in our community – people who have come from these halls, who have a tie to and love for our district. I think we have not tapped into that resource like we should.”

The district, he said, “is on the verge of some really exciting things.”