The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

BP-Husky Refining LLC announced a major equipment upgrade at the BP-Husky Toledo Refinery in Oregon, Ohio.

Refinery officials say the project will improve the efficiency and competitiveness of the refinery by reducing energy consumption and lowering operating costs. The estimated $400 million investment will create, on average, an additional 200 temporary construction jobs over the next few years, totaling one million man-hours.

“This project will be the largest investment in the refinery in quite some time,” said Ron Unnerstall, president and refinery manager of BP-Husky Refining LLC. “It will put hundreds of people to work this year, protect existing jobs, enhance energy security for the region and improve the plant’s overall efficiency while also improving competitiveness.

“The investment, which we refer to as our Reformer 3 project, will improve the efficiency and competitiveness of the refinery by reducing energy consumption and lowering operating costs. We will be replacing two existing reformers and one hydrogen plant with one new state-of- the-art reformer,” Unnerstall continued.

As 2009 winds down to a close, Oregon is optimistic about the economy.

Rieter Automotive North America, which manufactures fiber padding materials and molded acoustical products for autos, plans to expand its Oregon production facility, according to Gary Thompson, executive director of the Oregon Economic Development Foundation.

“It’s something we’re very excited about,” said Thompson. “The company has been aggressively pursuing additional work. In the short-term, there may be a couple of contracts that would add somewhere between 20-50 jobs. Long-term, because the company has pretty prudent financial management, and a lot of their competitors are filing for bankruptcy, they’re sitting pretty well to increase their market share. We’re just hoping their market share increases so more and more of that work can come to Oregon.”

The company previously expanded about 18 months ago and added 100 employees, said Thompson.

“They’re still hiring, and have not filled all the positions,” he said.

Budget cuts have taken the bite out of Barney, Northwood’s crime-fighting

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police dog.

Like most communities across the country, the city is struggling with a deep recession that has not yet lost its grip. The city cut costs to balance its budget, including two full-time officers, and Barney, a six-and-a-half-year-old shepherd that was purchased with a homeland security grant six years ago.

“Due to budgetary cutbacks, we can’t afford him anymore,” said Police Chief Tom Cairl.

The news caught Barney’s handler, Patrolman Fred Genzman, by surprise.

“It was a shock. I can’t complain because people are losing their full-time jobs. But it’s still a shock. He’s got three, maybe four good years left in him,” said Genzman, who’s been on the force for eight years.

Several students who were enrolled in the Oregon Career and Technology Center filed a lawsuit against the Oregon City Schools district for breach of contract, negligence and fraud in the Court of Common Pleas of Lucas County on Dec. 18.

The students, who were taking a Green Energy, Electrical & Environmental Specialist Program at the Center, allege that the program failed to live up to its promise to prepare them to work in the renewable energy industry.

The defendants are identified in the lawsuit as “John Does” who are administrators, employees and/or agents of the Oregon City Schools doing business as the Oregon Career & Technology Center.

The defendants, alleges the lawsuit: promised several hours of instruction in various subjects related to the renewable energy industry; represented in a student handbook “certain mission statements, statements of historical facts, policies, rules, regulations, objectives, accreditations, and accomplishments”; provided students a daily calendar for the program, “setting forth certain class schedule representations”; and made representations to entice students to enroll in the Green Energy, Electrical & Environmental Specialist Program.

Despite the concerns of environmental organizations and local citizen groups, state lawmakers passed and Gov. Ted Strickland signed House Bill 363, which completes the transfer of oversight of large scale farm animal feeding operations to the Ohio Department of Agriculture.

The state legislature has been authorizing the agriculture department to assume more responsibility for issuing permits for Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) since 2000. The new bill will transfer the permitting authority for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System for CAFOs to the agriculture department from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency.

According to the bill:

• It specifies the director of the agriculture department has the authority to enforce terms of NPDES permits for discharging, transporting, or handling of pollutants, including manure, from CAFOS.

Female coach

The Buffalo Bills last week hired the NFL's first female full-time coach (Kathryn Smith--special teams quality control coach). Should there be more women in coaching?
349369781 [{"id":"94","title":"Yes","votes":"17","pct":65.38,"type":"x","order":"1","resources":[]},{"id":"95","title":"No","votes":"9","pct":34.62,"type":"x","order":"2","resources":[]}] ["#194e84","#3b6b9c","#1f242a","#37414a","#60bb22","#f2babb"] sbar 160 160 /component/communitypolls/vote/39-female-coach No answer selected. Please try again. Thank you for your vote. Answers Votes ...