The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

Oregon City Council will vote on entering into a contract with AFSCME at a council meeting on Monday following lengthy negotiations.

“We did have quite an extended time period where we negotiated this agreement with AFSCME,” said Administrator Ken Filipiak at a committee of the whole meeting last Monday. “On balance, I think it’s a fair agreement. There’s some give and take in here. We addressed a lot of long standing issues that I know ultimately will lead to better efficiency. We addressed a few issues that were important to the union related to their seniority and other matters. It will probably save us a lot of money in the long run.”

The agreement “pretty well reflects what you’ve seen with the other bargaining units to this point, exactly in the same vein as the patrolmen’s,” said Filipiak. The cap for health insurance is the same, with a 90-10 split, he added.

A panel of elected officials assembled to examine the possible formation of a joint police district to service the villages of Genoa and Clay Center and Allen and Clay townships is turning its attention to conducting a survey of residents in the four jurisdictions.

Dave Fryman, a member of Genoa Village Council who chairs the Joint Law Enforcement Commission, said a survey will be discussed at the commission’s next meeting Aug. 20 at the Allen Township administration building.

The meeting starts at 7 p.m.

The Ohio Department of Development last October awarded a $42,000 grant to Genoa to fund a feasibility study of forming a joint law enforcement district.

Circuit Rider Management Group, Granville, O., has been retained to conduct the study.

Imagine a widespread E. coli outbreak that sickens millions of Americans. By the next year, the government determines that lax oversight exacerbated the problem and calls for restructured FDA regulations to protect consumers from tainted products.

In response, the industry cries foul. “These regulations will limit our innovations,” howl the food lobbyists. “Our customers deserve greater freedom of choice.”

Or, imagine this scenario. Children’s toys contaminated with lead paint have been found on store shelves, so the Consumer Product Safety Commission responds with regulations to protect children from dangerous toys.

“No fair,” cry toy-company lobbyists. “Low-income consumers can only afford the lead toys. Why should the government punish low-income families by regulating toys?”

Jerusalem Township trustees voted 2-0 to place a levy on the Nov. 3 ballot at a meeting on July 28 to fund sheriff’s patrols, which the township currently receives at no charge from Lucas County.

Trustees have not yet figured out the levy’s millage. They face an Aug. 20 deadline to place the levy on the November ballot.

The levy is in response to a notification by Lucas County commissioners last month that it was going to start charging nine unincorporated areas in the county, including Jerusalem Township, for sheriff’s patrols starting Jan. 1 due to budgetary constraints. That’s when commissioners plan to cut over $5 million from the sheriff’s budget.

Mayor Marge Brown, who is seeking a third term, and her challenger, long-time Councilman Mike Seferian, sparred for about an hour in a debate before about 150 people in St. Charles-Mercy Hospital’s auditorium Wednesday evening.

The debate was sponsored by the Eastern Maumee Bay Chamber of Commerce, The Press, WRSCradio.com and Channel 13. Jeff Smith from Channel 13 served as moderator.

Brown and Seferian answered questions on a variety of issues, including economic regionalism, a new senior center, the need for a full-time fire department, how to improve drainage, how to maximize the city’s greatest assets, Lake Erie and Maumee Bay State Park, and what can be done to help existing small businesses.

On economic regionalism, Brown, who had been chairman of the executive board of The Toledo Metropolitan Area Council of Governments (TMACOG), said sitting down and networking with area communities is important.

race relations improved

Has President Obama, America's first African American president, improved race relations since he has been in office?
996407711 [{"id":"64","title":"It's improved.","votes":"8","pct":20,"type":"x","order":"1","resources":[]},{"id":"65","title":"It's worse.","votes":"29","pct":72.5,"type":"x","order":"2","resources":[]},{"id":"66","title":"Stayed the same.","votes":"3","pct":7.5,"type":"x","order":"3","resources":[]}] ["#194e84","#3b6b9c","#1f242a","#37414a","#60bb22","#f2babb"] sbar 160 160 /component/communitypolls/vote/28-race-relations-improved No answer selected. Please try again. Thank you for your vote. Answers Votes ...