The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

The Kreager family of Oak Harbor is celebrating 180 years of marriage without a divorce. The achievement is noteworthy not only because 50 percent of all marriages end in divorce, but also because all five couples married their high school sweethearts.
The five couples, all Oak Harbor graduates, are Don and Bonnie, who will celebrate their 60th anniversary on October 26; son Randy and his wife Nancy (Gyde) (36 years); son Jeff and his wife Deb (Harder) (36 years); son John and his wife Laurie (Krasniewski) (24 years); and daughter Mary and her husband Dave Buehler (24 years).
All four children and their parents married young. Don was 20; Bonnie, 18; Randy, 21; Jeff, 19; John, 23, and Mary, 22. The achievement is more remarkable because 60 percent of marriages between couples under age 25 end in divorce.

If all goes well, the closed Brunner Elementary School will be in its new owner’s hands by mid-January.

Curtice resident Gary Moritz told the Genoa Planning Committee about a month ago he wanted to buy the building and renovate it for multiple purposes, including a gym area, a rental hall, and a business hub.

More than four years after filing a racial discrimination complaint, a Wood County sheriff’s deputy will have his case heard in court.

The U.S. Sixth District Court of Appeals last week ruled the complaint filed by Sgt. James Kimble against Sheriff Mark Wasylyshyn and the county commissioners contained sufficient circumstantial evidence to be heard in trial.

Kenny Hetrick, the owner of Tiger Ridge Exotics, says inspectors from the United States Department of Agriculture are threatening to fine him $60,000.

Hetrick estimates he has spent $12,000 making corrections to his Stony Ridge facility that has been a home to rescued lions, tigers, bears, wolves, bobcat, lynx, mountain lion, leopards and cheetah for 37 years.

He says that doesn’t seem to be enough to please inspectors from the USDA’s Animal and Plant Inspection Service.

“My side of the story is that I did every single thing that they tell me to do, and then they come back and they tell me that it is not good enough. Every time I do something, they come back with something else. So, over and over they keep doing that,” Hetrick said.

Hetrick fears the USDA is trying to put pressure on him to give up raising the exotic animals. There have also been complaints from animal rights activists.

Oregon City Council last Monday approved a project development agreement with BP Husky Refining LLC for the city’s flood relief and erosion control project.

The agreement spells out the cost share of the project between BP Husky and the city.

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