The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

Humane Ohio, a non-profit organization that provides low-cost spay/neuter to cats, is planning its annual “Beat the Heat” promotion next month to battle the expected influx of unwanted litters.

For just $20, Humane Ohio for the month of February will spay female cats in an effort to prevent unwanted litters in the spring and summer.

The special rate is even less than the group’s normal low-cost price and applies to all residents of Lucas and Wood  counties (must provide proof of residency).

To take advantage of the rate, cat owners must mention “Beat the Heat” when scheduling their appointments at 419-266-5607.

Jill Borkowski, marketing manager for Humane Ohio, said the group started the “Beat the Heat” promotion in 2007 to avoid the onslaught of unwanted litters in the spring and summer, the peak period for litters. The special rate of $20 is less than half or the group’s normal low-cost price, she added.

“Beat the Heat has become an annual promotion that’s in its third year. During the 2009 “Beat the Heat” promotion, we spayed 266 female cats and prevented countless unwanted litters,” said Borkowski.

Area school administrators agree there are many benefits for children to be enrolled in an all-day, everyday kindergarten program.

Then there is the ever present issue of having to fund it.

State Representative Randy Gardner last week offered sponsor testimony for a bill he introduced in November that would exempt districts from a requirement in the state’s biennium budget for all-day kindergarten and what he says are other unfunded mandates.

“The state operating budget has already cut state aid to school funding by $497 million, and these mandates will only further the financial burden of many school districts during this economic turmoil,” he said.

His bill, HB 366, directs the Ohio School Funding Advisory Council to identify unfunded or underfunded school mandates enacted in the budget.  A member of the council, Rep. Gardner says he’s already raised concerns at the panel’s first meeting.

“Under the new biennial budget, every school district for the first time in decades saw a significant cut to their funding. When enacted, my legislation will allow each school district’s board of education to decide if they can adopt the new education regulations, taking into account each district’s budgetary constraints,” Gardner said.

While trying to light the pilot light on his hot water heater, an explosion rocked

pic-laddhouse1

David Ladd’s world.

The process was slow enough that Ladd was
able to back away so the explosion did not burn his face, but it caused second degree burns on his legs. The ensuing fire, however, gutted his home on Route 105 near Elmore.

Fire departments from several nearby communities were at the scene and police had Route 105 closed in both directions. Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church Pastor David Nevergall immediately got in his car, drove to the scene, and circumnavigated the blockade.

“Sometimes it helps to have a collar on. I came around the corner on Graytown Road knowing that the roads are blocked. I told the officer who I was and he was very helpful in letting me get beyond the barricade and to the house,” Pastor Nevergall said.

Two residential structures in Northwood will be demolished this winter after being declared nuisances by the Wood County Health Department.

Funds from the Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP), also known as the “Welcome Home” program, will be used to raze the structures, according to Northwood City Administrator Pat Bacon.

An asbestos study has been completed and will be submitted to the Wood County Planning Commission, said Bacon.

“The next step is to advertise for bids,” she said. “My hope is to have the structures demolished and the property cleared in late January or early February.”

Bacon identified the structures to be removed. “I knew grant monies were there, so I identified two properties and said, `Let’s get going on these.’ So now it goes to the Wood County Planning Commission for its stamp of approval.”

The NSP grant can only be used in designated areas, said Bacon.

“The designated area in Northwood is where we have a lot of foreclosures,” she said.

The Ohio Department of Development will support the Northern Wood County Port Authority’s assessment project with a commitment of Clean Ohio Assistance Funds to clean up industrial property at the former Libbey-Owens-Ford (LOF) site in Northwood.

City Administrator Pat Bacon said $297,968 in brownfield redevelopment funds will be used to finance Phase II of an environmental assessment of the Industrial and Warehouse project on East Broadway.

The assessment will determine the environmental suitability of the property and the possible need for any remediation, said Bacon.

“The soil is contaminated. There’s no doubt about it,” said Bacon. “There used to be a paint shop there. There’s a huge building at the back of the property. It’s an ideal building for someone to relocate. For that to be an industrial park again, it just simply needs to be cleaned up because it’s contaminated. It’s very expensive to do.”

“Right now, no one is going to want to go in there because of the environmental issues,” said Mayor Mark Stoner.