The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

The new Wendy’s fast food restaurant at 2907 Navarre Ave., in Oregon raised funds for the athletic departments of three local high schools, and for the Toledo SeaGate Food bank as part of its grand opening last month.

On December 18, Wendy’s invited patrons to the new location to support the food bank. When patrons donated $5 or more to the food bank, they received a coupon for a combo meal. Over 200 customers made donations to the food bank, and Wendy’s matched the total of all donations, raising over $2,000.

 Contractors are expected to be at the site of the former Brush Beryllium plant in Luckey this week to conduct background air monitoring tests – a preliminary step before clean-up work plans are completed.

 Air monitoring stations will be set up along the fence line of the 40-acre site and will be operating for 90 days, Arleen Kreusch, an outreach program specialist for the Army Corps of Engineers, said.

 With the Eastwood School District planning to open a new school building this year that will replace two elementary schools as well as facing a fluid financial picture, members of the community are being asked to offer their input.

 Two organizations that were started to receive that input, the Business Advisory Council and Facilities Task Force, need new members, Brent Welker, superintendent, said.

 Construction of a major expansion of the Walbridge Library branch is nearing completion and library officials expect to have the building open to the public by late February.

 Michael Penrod, director of the Wood County District Public Library, led a tour of the building Thursday for library trustees and elected officials. The building is doubling in size from 4,000 to 8,000 square feet.

Oregon plans to partner with local industry to plant trees along property lines as a buffer or screen to nearby neighborhoods.

“We have some wonderful residential areas in Oregon,” said City Administrator Mike Beazley. “But we also have large industries. We share a lot of space with heavy industry. We think the mayor, council and administration want to invest in pre-plantings to help make it easier for our residential areas to peacefully co-exist with industrial areas.”

Calling it a “quality of life issue,” Beazley said tree screening “knocks down noise, knocks down smells and changes the view. “

“And they will enhance property values for our residents.”

 
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