The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

Seventy-four percent of 12-18 year olds have a profile on a social networking site, a Kaiser Family Foundation study concluded.

“Parents that think their kids don’t might be surprised that their kids do,” Oregon Schools information technology director Nathan Quigg said. “Most kids have switched over to Facebook because once Grandma and Ma got on MySpace, it was no longer hip. I’m sure once there is something new, they’ll switch again.”

Facebook has a rule that a child must be 13-years-old to have an account, but that is not always the case.

“Who checks? My 6-year-old can come along and say she’s 65,” Fassett Middle School information technology instructor Amy Sweet said. “But if you want to see more — see what people really have you must have your own settings. I strongly recommend if your child has a Facebook account, you must get the password.”

Sweet noted that social networking pages can be great for communication, when used in the right way.

Denial of zoning change upheld by court

An appeals court has upheld a decision by the Ottawa County Common Pleas Court to deny a request for a zoning variance by a man who wanted to construct an 8,200-square-foot building in Allen Township on land zoned for agricultural use.

Tim Miller had asked the Sixth District Court of Appeals to reverse the common pleas court decision after the lower court affirmed a decision by the township’s board of zoning appeals to deny the variance request.

Miller filed a request with the township for a variance permit in May, 2008. The zoning board, which conducted a public hearing on June, 4, turned him down, citing the township’s zoning resolution that sets a limit of 3,000 square feet for accessory buildings in an agriculture district.

The common pleas court affirmed the zoning board decision on July 10.

Miller’s appeal contended the common pleas court erred by disregarding that the zoning board’s decision constituted “unreasonable and arbitrary enforcement of the (zoning) ordinance.”

He also argued the common pleas court erred when it didn’t rule a typographical error in the zoning board’s public hearing notice adversely affected his request.

A person driving west on Monroe Street passes a “gateway” at the intersection of Monroe Street and Alexis Road announcing his entrance into Sylvania. Other communities do the same thing.

During her campaign for a city council seat, Sandy Bihn said she would seek a similar gateway for Oregon, as well as seek ways to enhance the business district.

Now that she has been elected and returned to council, Bihn has organized an open committee to discuss themes and grants for these projects.

“We’re starting with the idea of how to improve the appearance and the feel of people traveling down Route 2. One of the first places that we looked at was I-280 and the southbound ramp, and we’re looking at now at the possibility of having some type of what they call a gateway as you get off the ramp. There is a grant that is available to put in some landscaping and stone. We obviously have to work with the city to make sure that it is all done right,” Bihn said.

Attending committee meetings are local business owners, including Alan Miller, Dennis Pavley, and Karen Magnone, sales manager for Comfort Inns. Bihn also has seen representatives from Dunn Chevy-Old, the Eagle’s Nest restaurant, and other local businesses.

It's called a Farmall H., and instead of plowing fields, the 4,000-pound behemoth that was built during the Harry Truman presidency is now being used as a teaching device for Future Farmers of America students at Woodmore High School.

Adam Downs, who teaches Agricultural Education at Woodmore, bought the 62-year-old tractor from his grandfather, Raymond Downs, so that his students could tear it down and restore it to its original glory.

"Basically, it was used for everything from plowing, planting, bailing hay," said Downs, who has taught at Woodmore for nine years. "My grandpa had it for quite a while and I bought it from him. It's worth maybe a couple thousand completely restored. But to restore it right, it would probably cost you more to restore it than it's actually worth."

Woodmore's Agricultural Education - or Ag Ed - program is a satellite program of the Penta County Career Center. Downs said he teaches about 70 students a day in the program, which features two Ag science classes, two Ag business classes, a horticulture class, a food and meat science class and an Ag machines class, which is restoring the tractor.

A Genoa police officer suspended for arranging restitution in a stolen bicycle case involving a mentally-challenged resident should be lauded not punished, his lawyer said Monday.

“He should be commended for what he did – not chastised. He was helping that girl that lost the use of this bicycle,” attorney Tom Tomczak said regarding his client, Police Sgt. Todd Mocniak.

The sergeant served a three-day suspension without pay following a Feb. 23 hearing with Genoa Mayor Mark Williams in connection with the fall 2009 theft investigation. He was scheduled to return to work Wednesday.

Williams, who also serves as the village’s safety director, determined Mocniak had violated a police manual policy regarding “abuse of position.”

“We basically do our best to ensure all employees adhere to the policy of the department. The appropriate steps were taken and we hope it never happens again,” Genoa Police Chief Randy Hill said last week after the decision.

Tomczak, however, described the hearing as unfair from the outset.

Bill Cosby

In your opinion, do the allegations against Bill Cosby have any credibility?
605566221 [{"id":"30","title":"Yes","votes":"5","pct":71.43,"type":"x","order":"1","resources":[]},{"id":"31","title":"No","votes":"2","pct":28.57,"type":"x","order":"2","resources":[]}] ["#194e84","#3b6b9c","#1f242a","#37414a","#60bb22","#f2babb"] sbar 160 160 /component/communitypolls/vote/13-bill-cosby No answer selected. Please try again. Thank you for your vote. Answers Votes ...