The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

The Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority received a $2 million grant from the state to clean up the former industrial park at Beazer, also known as the former Toledo Coke site, located at the Port of Toledo.

The Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund (CORF) grant will allow the Port to complete the remaining environmental remediation and demolition activities at the site, just off Front Street.

The Port believes that the site will create several construction jobs and draw hundreds of new manufacturing and seaport jobs when the cleanup is complete.

Possible business markets that might be drawn to the site include agricultural, alternative energy, automotive, plastics, glass, as well as other manufacturers.

Matthew Sapara, the Port’s director of economic development, said there are several companies involved in manufacturing and alternative energy “that are looking for a place to land.”

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Back to the Wild, a non-profit wildlife rehabilitation center, warns on its

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website that “sometimes a local animal rescue is a bit dramatic.”

The Castalia-based center’s founder, Mona Rutger, and her husband Bill Rutger, say an animal rescue can be dangerous, too.

“You kind of learn the hard way,” Mona said. “We’ve been injured quite a bit. It’s not the animal’s fault. They are just trying to survive.”

But it’s very possible that the end result can be satisfying, too. Two locally-based impromptu rescuers are hoping just that.

That was the case Tuesday afternoon between 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. when Metroparks of the Toledo Area Ranger Richard Kiss and his second cousin, Jerusalem Township trustee Joe Kiss, encountered a sick male bald eagle near Cedar Point Road.

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Councilman-elect Sandy Bihn is hoping to get some ideas on improving Navarre Avenue to maintain and attract more businesses to the area.

A meeting will be held on Dec. 1 at 3 p.m. in the Oregon Public Library to discuss the matter.

“The public is invited,” said Bihn, “but it’s targeted to the people who have businesses in the State Route 2 area.”

“The purpose of the meeting is to discuss ways to make the Route 2 area more attractive to existing and potential businesses visually and to start networking to try and improve the overall image and ability to retain and attract businesses,” she said.

A retail analysis of State Route 2 conducted in 2007 by Pitney Bowes/MapInfo, of Ann Arbor, notes that one of the impediments to attracting and keeping retail is a “hodge podge” appearance on Navarre Avenue.

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Castalia-based Back to the Wild animal refuge center founder Mona Rutger says

that years ago man-made toxins became partly responsible for bald eagles finding a spot on the endangered species list, which they are not anymore.

In Lake Erie pesticides from farm runoff was causing a problem.

“It’s probably not from the fish much anymore. They used to be full of DDT, of course, and that’s been banned and they’ve made a tremendous comeback because DDT has been eliminated. But they were getting poisoned right and left,” Mona said.

“It was a pesticide, and they ate so much fish. Its runoff, and when it rained the DDT got into the lakes and rivers and streams and it poisoned the fish and it passed through the food chain to the eagles. Eagles eat a tremendous amount of fish,” she continued.

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The Army Corps of Engineers expects to complete soil sampling at the former Brush Beryllium site near the Village of Luckey in December.

The sampling and topographic surveying are part of an on-going remedial program for the 40-acre parcel at 21200 Luckey Road,

Results from the work will provide the Corps with the necessary data for the next phase of the clean-up of the site, said Duane Lenhardt, project manager.

“This data is required to complete our remedial design, update the estimated cost associated with the clean-up, and proceed to environmental remediation,” he said.

Under rules set by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the Corps in October began the testing to determine the extent of soil contamination.

The work includes:
• Clearing the planned study areas
• Performing a topographic survey using a 3-D laser scanning method to map out site features such as buildings, roads, and other surface objects.
• Conducting geophysical surveys over select areas of the site using electromagnetic methods.
• Conducting about 100 soil borings using a sonic drilling method.

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