The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

The City of Oregon took in considerably less revenue last year than the year before, according Administrator Mike Beazley, who gave an end of the year financial assessment to city council at a meeting on Jan. 10.

“Our revenues came in about $1.6 million under budget,” he said. “Last year, we took in $17 million. This year, we took in $15,496,000.”

Income tax revenue fluctuated between $17.4 million and $17.6 million each year in 2007, 2008, and 2009, he added. “There was an overpayment by a large corporate taxpayer that got refunded the following year. This year, on the income tax side, we took in $15.9 million. That’s a fairly significant downturn,” he said.

“We did manage to control the impact on our revenues by really curtailing expenditures this year by $800,000. We ended up this year with a hit to the reserve of about $780,000. We expected it to be something north of a million, and it ended up coming in a couple hundred thousand dollars short of that.”

After the meeting, Beazley said the city has about $11 million in reserve.

Over the past several years the Toledo Public Schools have suffered many financial setbacks and still find the system struggling to keep up with the economy. There are many urban schools that are facing issues much like the TPS schools around the country. The once proud Toledo City Athletic League is now facing a challenge that may be its biggest ever.

Last year the TPS system eliminated middle school, freshman, and some high school sports with low participation. That was a big blow to the remaining high school sports. The biggest blow is the imploding of the TCL when seven schools left to form a new conference, the Three Rivers Athletic Conference. That now leaves six TPS schools, after Libbey closed this past season, for next season to be in the TCL and they include — Bowsher, Rogers, Scott, Start, Waite, and Woodward. I will admit all of this does not look good and listening to the present Commissioner of the TCL he doesn’t see much hope for the future. He doesn’t seem to want to fix the problems either.

Almost $1.5 billion changed hands at farmers' markets across the United States in 2010. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the number of markets rose by 16 percent last year--from 5,247 to 6,132. More than three million Americans regularly buy food from the more than 60,000 farmers  who sell at these markets each year.

Even though I'm a big fan of this kind of grocery shopping, I was pretty surprised by those numbers. This isn't the result of some multi-million dollar corporate advertising campaign. Farmers' markets succeed because more and more Americans prefer to eat food that's fresh, grown locally, and bought directly from the farmer who grew or produced it. Instead of popping open a can or grabbing something from a box, you can get a real feel for your food and how it was created.

From Windham, Maine, to Hanalai, Hawaii, consumers are finding that going to farmers' markets isn't just for foodies or health fanatics. It's about better quality, tastier food, purchased in a location where you get a sense of community amidst the crisp greens, fresh meats, and artisan cheeses. You get to know where your food comes from and who produces it. You'll never get that knowledge in a big box store.

Oregon may be revising part of the city’s sign code to allow electronic changeable copy for businesses.

Oregon Mayor Mike Seferian said at a recent council meeting that he’s received many requests from businesses seeking changes in the sign code dealing with changeable copy.

“The trend nowadays is that signs are LED enhanced, or lit with LED lights,” said Seferian. “We want a starting point to get this into action, so we would actually look forward to seeing council put this into committee so it could be discussed thoroughly so people could be comfortable with the final product. But we do think it’s something needed for our sign code because it seems to be a little antiquated without it.”

New rules for the Ohio House of Representatives, written for the most part by Randy Gardner (R- Bowling Green), were approved by the House Tuesday.

Republicans gained control of the House – and the chance to set the body’s rules for the session that recently started -  in the November election. Rep. Gardner said the rules will “promote a more open and fair legislative process.”

He points to what he sees as three significant changes:
•The number of full standing committees is reduced from 27 to 17. Rep. Gardner and House Speaker William Batchelder (R- Medina) say fewer committees foster a “greater focus” on issues and will save taxpayers about $250,000 over the next two years.

• A two-day waiting and reading period has bee re-established for any final votes on bills containing appropriations. The rule requires two days following a conference committee vote before the House may consider the budget.

water crisis

Are you prepared for another water crisis this summer if there is an algae bloom that shuts down the water supply?
1496266565 [{"id":"67","title":"Yes, I have bottles of water in reserve","votes":"1","pct":50,"type":"x","order":"1","resources":[]},{"id":"68","title":"No. I think the city will be able to treat it without shutting down the water supply.","votes":"1","pct":50,"type":"x","order":"2","resources":[]},{"id":"69","title":"No. I'm taking my chances.","votes":"0","pct":0,"type":"x","order":"3","resources":[]}] ["#194e84","#3b6b9c","#1f242a","#37414a","#60bb22","#f2babb"] sbar 160 160 /component/communitypolls/vote/29-water-crisis No answer selected. Please try again. Thank you for your vote. Answers Votes ...