The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

A recently passed bill in the state legislature makes it possible for expectant parents to receive standardized information about umbilical cord blood banking.

The term “cord blood” is used for blood that is drawn from the umbilical cord and the placenta after a baby is born. Unless parents decide otherwise, the blood cells are discarded as medical waste.  Cord blood is collected because it contains stem cells, which have the ability to renew themselves.   The cells offer lifesaving medical benefits and are different from both the embryonic stem cells in a fertilized egg and stem cells obtained from a child or adult person, proponents of the bill say.

“A growing percentage of stem cell transplant patients are receiving cord blood to cure more than 70 diseases,” Dr. Alvin D. Jackson, director of the Ohio Department of Health, said. “Seventy percent of patients who need a transplant of blood-forming stem cells do not have a matching donor in their own family, and their physician must search public registries of donors.”

The law requires the health department to make available to health care professionals printable publications that can be downloaded from the department’s website.  The law also requires the department to encourage health care providers of services directly related to a woman’s pregnancy to provide the publication before her third trimester of pregnancy.

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Whether or not a non-profit organization will donate as much as $50,000 for the preservation of a 101-year-old former school building in the Village of Millbury or instead donate the money for a park may not be known for weeks.

Karen Prymicz, who chairs the 1909 Committee, said she’s scheduling a meeting of committee members to discuss a letter from the current owner of the Millbury School building, asking her to follow through on a “pledge” to donate the funds for the building’s preservation.

1909schoolVerticle
Jerry O'Reilly in front of the
historic Millbury school. (Press
photo by Ken Grosjean)

Prymicz last week confirmed she received the letter, written by Walbridge attorney Douglas Perras on behalf of Jerry O’Reilly, who purchased the building and property at a public auction in April, 2008.

She declined to comment on the matter, however, until after the committee had met, which she said would be in “the next several weeks.”

The Wood County Auditor’s website lists a sale price of $45,100.

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Representatives of Great Lakes environmental groups let President Barack Obama know how they feel about the encroachment of the Asian carp on the lakes.

More than 10,000 post cards were hand delivered in Washington, D.C., urging the president to demand federal regulators implement a solution, including the construction of a permanent barrier to separate the Great Lakes from the Mississippi River system – considered the main route the carp are following to reach the lakes.

“Our message from people around the region couldn’t be clearer: `We cannot wait any longer. We want a permanent solution that will protect our Great Lakes way of life,’ “ said Cheryl Mendoza, associate director of Freshwater Future.

The groups argue a permanent barrier between the two watersheds – which they say was “artificially” connected about 100 years ago to direct Chicago’s wastewater away from Lake Michigan – is the only guaranteed way to keep Asian carp and other destructive species from traveling between the two basins.

In June, a live Asian carp was caught by commercial fishermen in Lake Calumet near Chicago – past an electrical barrier designed to stop it. And earlier DNA sampling has found traces of the carp in the Chicago Area Waterway System, a tributary of the Great Lakes.

Joel Brammeier, president of the Alliance for the Great Lakes, said the Army Corps of Engineers must be directed now to complete a study of how to install a permanent divide between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi basins at Chicago in the next 18 months.

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He nabbed car thieves, intimidated juveniles looking for trouble, and helped secure local sites for presidential candidates

Barney, Northwood’s crime-fighting police dog, dodged a bullet last year when some residents stepped in to donate funds for his continued service after the city cut the K-9 from the budget due to a poor economy.

But in August, not even residents could help Barney avoid his fiercest foe to date: cancer. The city recently announced that Barney, purchased by a Homeland Security Grant six-and-a-half years ago, was retiring for gooddue to health reasons.

Patrolman Fred Genzman, who was Barney’s handler, said he had no clue Barney

k91a
Patrolman Fred Genzman
with Barney. (Press photo
by Ken Grosjean)

was ill when the seven-and-a-half-year old shepherd started having training issues a few months ago. As part of his K-9 certification test taken every two years, Barney is required to detect explosive odors, which he always did with flying colors. This summer, he uncharacteristically missed a few times, said Genzman..

“He’s never had problems like this before,” said Genzman. “We tried to fix it. We went to Cleveland, talked to different handlers and trainers. We just couldn’t pinpoint the problem,” he said.

As a last resort, Genzman took Barney to a veterinarian for a checkup.

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Oregon will submit grant applications to the Ohio Public Works Commission to help fund Phase 2 of the city’s Sanitary Sewer Rehabilitation Project, and the Flood Relief Erosion Control Project.

The sanitary sewer rehabilitation project consists of rehabilitating trunk and local sanitary sewers to reduce inflow/infiltration.

Phase I involved lining several sanitary sewers underneath creeks, according to Public Service Director Paul Roman.

“This second phase also includes lining the Wheeling Street trunk sewer between Navarre Avenue and Seaman Road,” Roman said at an Oregon council meeting last Monday.

Phase 2 calls for the replacement of sewers in Cresceus and Mambrino roads, and Dearborn Avenue, he said.

“Last year, we submitted this project, but did not receive funding. There was a lot of competition, mainly from Toledo city projects,” said Roman. “Hopefully, there will be less competition this year. But I certainly want to resubmit it and take a second try at getting it funded.”

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