The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

City plows, while clearing streets of snow in the last couple of weeks, have inadvertently covered fire hydrants, raising concerns in Oregon about the ability of the fire department to find them to fight a possible fire.
 
City Councilman James Seaman said at a meeting last week that he had just cleared snow from his front yard when a city plow sprayed additional snow onto the apron of his driveway and onto a nearby fire hydrant.
 
“It’s a safety concern. We’re having a banner year for snow. In front of my house, I have a fire hydrant. By the time I’m shoveling the apron of my driveway, the plows, which are coming through real nicely, are plowing the snow up. It’s almost like it’s not there anymore,” Seaman said of the hydrant. “I’m sure it’s like that in other parts of the city.”
 
The possibility of the fire department not being able to access or find a hydrant at a time when people are increasingly using auxiliary heaters in their homes as a result of the snow and cold temperatures, said Seaman, is very real.

A vote by city council to amend the municipal code that would allow for signs with electronic changeable copy will have to wait.
 
The city’s Economic Development and Planning Committee has been discussing the proposed changes since last month, but wants to fine tune the measure before sending it to council.
 
“It’s something the committee has talked about twice,” said Oregon Mayor Mike Seferian. The committee will meet next Monday at 7 p.m. before the 8 p.m. council meeting, to further discuss the changes, he added.
 
“There are some points in which we have reached some consensus,” Councilman Jerry Peach, chairman of the Economic Development and Planning Committee, said. “We committee members are well aware that not all members of council are there. There’s a couple of other things that are still under consideration.”

Nearly 200 people made their way into Morrison R. Waite High School’s cafeteria to listen to Toledo Public School officials present its “Transformation Plan” last week.
 
The plan could mean redistricting students, closing schools, eliminating specialized teachers in art, music, and physical education, and creating specialized high schools.
 
The plan does not eliminate specialized classes. Instead, students would be taught those subjects by non-specialized teachers.
 
Walking into the cafeteria, a guest was approached by a coalition of art teachers with a pamphlet headlined, “Why do the kids need art?” and “Why do kids need art teachers?”

Talk about a guy who doesn't let a handicap slow him down.

Leland Foster has suffered from cerebral palsy his entire life, and he uses a wheelchair. But as instructor Tony Spallino's integrated machining and engineering students found out last fall, Foster is perfectly capable of taking care of himself.

“He's a brilliant mind, very personable,” Spallino said. “He'll joke about things, even his CP. To him, he doesn't have a disability. He's done more than 10 able-bodied people I know. He's done marathons, he snow skis, he water skis, he's done the New York Marathon. He's the most active person I know, but he's trapped in this body that limits him.”

Jodi Gross has lived in East Toledo her entire adult life, so she doesn’t need a lot of motivation for her newest job.

An employee of the East Toledo Family Center, Gross has taken on the official role as “community builder” for a new organization, East Toledo United. She is to assist in mapping the community and survey the Garfield and Birmingham neighborhoods for member organizations of East Toledo United.

JodyGross
         Jodi Gross

The mission of ETU “is to capitalize on the unique assets, geographic location, talents, and skills of all entities, including residents, to improve the East Toledo community and to enhance communication and collaboration.”

It is one of the realizations coming out of a $200,000 T-grant from the Local Initiative Support Coalition’s (LISC) “Connecting the Pieces” project. The grant was originally established to support the development of a neighborhood transformation plan to connect old and new neighborhoods in light of the pending development of the 127-acre Marina District.

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Should S. Carolina lawmakers vote to remove the Confederate flag from the State House Grounds?
1600367855 [{"id":"56","title":"Yes","votes":"8","pct":50,"type":"x","order":"1","resources":[]},{"id":"57","title":"No","votes":"8","pct":50,"type":"x","order":"2","resources":[]}] ["#194e84","#3b6b9c","#1f242a","#37414a","#60bb22","#f2babb"] sbar 160 160 /component/communitypolls/vote/25-confederate-flag No answer selected. Please try again. Thank you for your vote. Answers Votes ...