The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

Det. Mick Lento, of the Lake Township Police Department, has some straight forward advice for township residents: lock the doors of your garages and other residential buildings as well as your vehicles.

The township has been hit by a string of burglaries in recent weeks as thieves focus on garages, barns, and other out-buildings.

Det. Lento said a majority of the buildings involved in the burglaries had been left unlocked.

“We’re getting hit pretty hard,” he said. “We want to get the word out to the residents to secure their homes and buildings.”

Four of the residences hit were on or near Owens Road.

Hand and power tools, generators, and other equipment are being targeted although one resident had venison and fish taken from a freezer.

Ottawa County Common Pleas Court Judge Bruce Winters will grant a request to have William J. Liske, Jr., 24, undergo an evaluation to determine if he is mentally competent to stand trial.

Liske’s attorney, Adrian Cimerman, informed the court Wednesday he intended to file a motion requesting the evaluation. He entered pleas of not guilty on behalf of Liske, who’s been indicted on charges of aggravated murder and aggravated robbery of three family members.

During Liske’s arraignment, Judge Winters set bond at $3 million and informed Cimerman he’d approve his motion for the evaluation.

Liske is charged with killing his father, William E. Liske, Jr. 53; his wife, (the younger Liske’s step-mother) Susan Liske, 46, and her son. Derek Griffin, 23, at their home along North State Route 2 in Benton Township.

Their bodies were found by family members on Oct. 31 and Liske was apprehended later that day in Carroll County.

Except for responding to questions from the judge about his employment and financial status, Liske sat silent during his arraignment and showed little emotion. Judge Winters declared him indigent and eligible for a court-appointed attorney.

Judge Winters read each count in the indictment, which includes six counts of aggravated murder.

Genoa Village Council will meet in special session tonight (April 26) to discuss whether to investigate a possible misappropriation of public funds.

Councilman Eric Hise, who asked for the special meeting, said Sunday that he wants council to look into a position held by a person working at village hall.

Hise would not name the person or detail specifics such as hours and pay until council meets. However, he said the person performs clerical work as well as part-time tax work.

“The job started as part of a county thing, being placed here. But it was supposed to end in January 2009 and the person is still here,” Hise said.

The problem, he claimed, is there have been no ordinances regarding hiring or pay brought before council; yet the person remains on the payroll.

It was a bright and sunny Halloween afternoon.

Just before 1 p.m., a contingent of Kathy Martin’s family members, neighbors and friends began to gather at her son Patrick’s home on South Eastmoreland Drive in Oregon, waiting for a sign of the Hostess Prize Patrol.

The Hostess representatives, accompanied by an agent from a Boston underwriting company, were coming to offer Kathy a chance to win a $1 million as part of the “Hand Out Hostess on Halloween Sweepstakes.”

Much to the crowd’s delight, they were accompanied by a a truck filled with Twinkies, Cupcakes, Ding Dongs and more.

The former Millbury woman – a self-described sweepstakes junkie – won the contest through an online e-mail sweepstakes. She was visiting her son in Oregon as she made her way from her Michigan home to Florida, where she spends the winter with her mother.

After the formalities were completed, the underwriter distributed 15 oversized envelopes, which were held by Kathy’s grandchildren and neighbor children.

With the defeat of a 5.9-mill emergency operating levy for the Oregon City Schools district, the school board plans to make further cuts to avoid a looming budget deficit in 2012.

The levy, which would have brought in $3.4 million annually, was defeated last Tuesday by a vote of 5,603 to 3,907, according to unofficial results from the Toledo Lucas County Board of Elections.

The levy would have cost the owner of a $100,000 home $182 annually.

It is the second time voters rejected a levy in the district since 2009. In August, 2009, voters defeated the same measure 3,605 to 1,119.

The school board had pinned its hopes on the levy passing this time because it made more cuts in the operating budget in the last year. In total, the board has cut $8 million from the budget in the last three years, including 32 teaching positions.

The district also negotiated concessions with both classified and certified teachers’ unions.