The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

Oregon will see its budget revenue drop by $2 million in the next couple of years as a result of the continuing economic recession and cuts in the state budget. But not to worry. Through attrition, the city is confident it will keep expenses in check.

“We have a good cooperative relationship with our employees,” said City Administrator Mike Beazley. “We have to find ways to make sure we deliver excellent services with a smaller government. We can get smaller by not filling vacancies and being more efficient. It’s something the private and public sectors are going through together. It’s not a real surprise.”

State seeks options for leveraging turnpike
 
The Ohio Office of Budget and Management and the Ohio Department of Transportation have announced they are seeking Letters of Interest for the development and evaluation of options for “leveraging” the Ohio Turnpike.

The process could include three phases. An analysis and review will be conducted to help determine a value of turnpike and the preferred option for leveraging it as a state asset.

Curtice resident Amber Anderson – all 5-foot-3 inches of her – was working in home health care with the Volunteers of America before she enrolled in Owens Community College's seven-month Ohio Basic Peace Officer Training Academy course.

“I was always told I would never make it as a police officer because I was a woman,” Anderson said. “It's a very male-dominated field, so it's very intimidating already. But, if you're not happy with what you're going to do for a living, you're going to be miserable all your life. I believe in everything a police officer stands for.”

After convening an emergency meeting Wednesday, the Lake school board re-approved the resolution needed for placing a 4.75-mill, 5-year levy on the November ballot.

The board had met Tuesday and adopted the same resolution, said treasurer Jeff Carpenter, but the required number of board members wasn’t present as some were out of town or had job responsibilities.

When Elmore native Loren Hall posed for a photo atop a locally-made bicycle in 1892, the youngster probably didn’t realize the Elmore Manufacturing Co. would reach a nationwide market with the “Elmore Roadster” that cost about $100.

Seven years later the company, headed by Harmon Becker and his sons, would cease bicycle production and focus on manufacturing what would be called the Elmore Car in a Clyde, O. plant. That vehicle would also be sold to a large market and be used by taxi companies in Washington, D.C.

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