The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

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Though many people make losing weight their number-one New Year’s resolution, getting fit and maintaining a healthy lifestyle – and teaching children in our lives by example to do the same – should be the goal for 2014 and a lifetime, says Dayre Carpenter of Focus Fitness of Oregon.

“The sooner you get started, the better you’ll feel, and the more conscious you are of what you eat,” says Carpenter, a licensed fitness instructor and a personal trainer certified by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).

“My programs and classes aren’t about getting skinny,” she says. “I’m focused on helping adults, youths and families get more active and healthy. Fitness has a real impact on family life. And parents can help kids stay active by setting a good example.”

Carpenter turned her focus to fitness and became a certified personal trainer after caring for her grandparents, who died in 2007. “My grandmother suffered with Type II diabetes and other chronic conditions that were preventable,” she says. “She just needed to be more active.”

Focus Fitness is offering Cookie-Crushing, Resolution Rocking Workouts Mondays and Fridays from 5:30-6 p.m. through Jan. 31, 2014, inside New Harvest Church, 3540 Seaman Rd, Oregon.

The total body, moderate-intensity group workouts are designed to help participants fight the battle of the post-holiday bulge and get a healthy start in 2014. (Not intended for ages 15 and younger.) The cost is $10 per week.

In addition, a family-friendly free Beginner’s Workout is offered Monday and Friday from 6:30-7 p.m., also through Jan. 31.

An Absolutely Abs classes – short, focused and intense workouts designed to work abs and strengthen the core – are offered Monday and Friday from 7-7:15 p.m. The cost is $5 per class or $3 for series members.

Child care is available for parents during workouts for just $2 per child with 24-hour notice.

Citing studies from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that estimate that one in every four children in America is overweight to obese, and nearly one in five is sedentary (defined as no participation in 104 activities in an entire calendar year), Carpenter is planning to offer after-school youth fitness sessions at Coy Elementary.

“Studies show fitness is closely linked with better grades, better attendance and better self-esteem, which can help prevent problems with bullying. And a workout is a great de-stressor.”

Carpenter chooses to hold classes in available church and school spaces to keep the cost down and ensure accessibility for community members. “Health is a community issue and should be addressed as such,” she said.

In the theme of “practice what you preach,” Focus Fitness is offering a Worship Leader Workout Class to help ministers share a little “sweat equity” with their congregants. “(Members of) the ministry can set good examples, too,” she says. “And they can show church-goers what they’re made of.”

Focus Fitness recently began working with Food for Thought, the Oregon-based food pantry.

“Right now when you bring a jar of peanut butter for the food pantry, you can try a workout class free,” Carpenter says. “Food for Thought still makes 350 sack lunches every Friday for the homeless. In February, people who volunteer to help make sandwiches on Friday will be invited to attend a family-friendly fitness class immediately after. So parents can teach their kids the value of healthy exercise and the rewards of helping others at the same time.”

Always open to new class development if a small group forms, Focus Fitness also offers fitness instruction at work sites, as well as personal training sessions for couples and individuals in their home or other appropriate locations.

For class schedules, questions or to enroll online, visit www.focusfitnessoforegon.com or call 419-684-0846 for information.

For weekly sessions, reserve a spot 48 hours in advance. Call 419-684-0846, visit www.focusfitnessoforegon.com or message Focus Fitness on Facebook to reserve a spot.