The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

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Woodmore fall sports teams are bringing awareness and to get donations for ovarian cancer, breast cancer and cystic fibrosis.

The Wildcat football team commenced its season with a big win against opponent Port Clinton, while showing off teal socks and teal stickers on their helmets to support ovarian cancer. The student section and cheerleaders were also involved in the night’s awareness by incorporating teal into their attire.

Ovarian Cancer Awareness Night was organized by Donna Sandwisch, Holly Berry and Gerri and Mike Brossia. The night was not purely to raise money, but also to honor Sandwisch’s mother, Carole Schultz, and friend Norma Brossia.

On that same field, the Woodmore girls’ soccer game hosted Ottawa Hills Oct. 5 for a charity game in support of cystic fibrosis. Senior Allie Wank went to the coach, Mr. Jason Allen, and suggested the idea to honor two Wildcats, Carson and Kennedy Slates.

Funds raised were to be donated to the CF Foundation to help with the costs of daily life for the kids. On average, the family pays $242.45 per day for enzymes, aerosols and vest treatments with the help of insurance. Other families are not as lucky, so all proceeds and donations will go to the CF Foundation.

“It means so much to us and the kids that they would think about them and put time and effort to raise money for a cause that they are not even directly affected by,” said Amy Slates, mother of the children. “It shows what wonderful, giving and caring students we have at Woodmore.

The Wildcat volleyball team is keeping the tradition going by participating in Volley for the Cure. This year, the team is being supported by Woodmore Key Club. Varsity Coach Erin Reynolds stated that it was nice to have extra support from a school club. On average, the Wildcats raise over $1,000 each year and hopes to do just as well this coming year.

“It feels great to help raise money to find a cure, when it affects women all over the world,” said senior Maddie Phillips.