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Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

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The Lake Township trustees have approved an agreement with Perrysburg and Troy townships that will provide immediate back-up service between the townships’ fire departments on calls involving structure fires.

Under the agreement approved Tuesday, the townships will provide tanker trucks immediately to help each other with structure fires in areas where there are no fire hydrants or a reliable water supply.

Lake Township has a similar agreement with the Allen-Clay Joint Fire District, said Todd Walters, township fire chief, and with the City of Northwood.

“This should help us get 15,000 gallons of water on the road right away,” he told the trustees.

He estimated about one-half of the southern portion of the township is without hydrants.

He said the area will be mapped out and provided to emergency dispatchers.

The township’s insurance rating should improve because of the agreement, Walters told the trustees.

In February, the trustees approved an automatic aid policy for the township to assist the Northwood Fire Department with structure fires.

That agreement calls for the township fire department to automatically send a fire engine from station 1 on Walbridge Road  and a rapid intervention team from station 2 on Ayers Road to all reported structure fires in the portion of Northwood covered by the city’s station on Wales Road – primarily the eastern end of the city.

A township tanker will also be dispatched to fires on Fostoria Road and parts of Williston and Curtice roads where there are no hydrants.

The Northwood department, in turn, will automatically send an engine to all reported structure fires in the township and in certain commercial areas the city will also respond with a ladder truck.

In November, 2010, the trustees approved a response agreement with the Allen-Clay district for structures.

By February of this year, Lake Township had responded to eight fires in the district’s jurisdiction and the district had responded to 12 fires in the township, Chief Walters said at the time.


Radar policy opposed
A letter formally asking the Village of Walbridge Police Department to not post a radar patrol car at the Lake Township Fire Department station on Walbridge Road will be presented to the board of trustees at the board’s first meeting in September.

Melanie Bowen, who chairs the board, said after Tuesday’s meeting she plans to have the letter written for consideration by the board after receiving a few complaints from residents.

Bowen, herself a resident of Walbridge, said she’s asked Walbridge Mayor Dan Wilczynski and Police Chief Ken Frost to end the practice of having a patrol car equipped with radar monitoring Walbridge Road traffic while parked at the fire station, which is on township property.

But as recently as the week before the trustees’ Aug. 21 meeting there was a village radar patrol cruiser at the station, she said.

“I’ve asked to have them not do that but they still were,” Bowen said. “So we’ll put it in writing.”

For motorists on that stretch of Walbridge Road, the speed limit can be confusing. On the west-bound lane into the village from the I-280 overpass the limit drops to 25 mph at the village line. The portion of the east-bound lane in the township has a speed limit of 55 mph.

Richard Welling, a trustee, said he and fellow trustee Ron Sims have also received complaints from village residents.

He said he supported sending a letter to the village administration.

“It makes it look like we’re working with the village to give residents tickets and we’re not,” Welling said.

Email messages left with Mayor Wilczynski and Chief Frost for comment were not returned.