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Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

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With many people being bullied, one might not know that there are many different types of it.

Bullying, by definition, is behavior that’s aggressive and involves negative, unwanted actions. It can be in the form of verbal, physical and cyber actions.

Verbal bullying includes calling people names, harassing others and making fun of people. This type of bullying is usually one of the most common types of bullying.

Physical bullying may include pushing/shoving, playing pranks and fighting. This form of bullying is the easiest type of bullying to recognize.

Cyber bullying has been gaining more attention with social networking and texting. This involves verbal bullying over the computer or phone. Much of it can be done by anyone because of the lack of supervision and can be done anonymously.

Bullying has many effects such as depression, insecurity and even suicide. Many programs are available to those who are affected by any type of bullying. Whatever the type, bullying is wrong and should be stopped.


Traits of bullied children
Sometimes children that are being bullied often stand out as different in some way because of appearance, sexual orientation, intellect, socio-economic background, cultural or religious background or for just being different.

Just as there is no one definitive profile of a bully, there is no one profile of a child who gets bullied.

The reasons a child becomes bullied may include: being too fat or thin. being too tall or short, being from a different culture and believed to be homosexual.

Children that tend to be bullied are sensitive, think poorly of themselves, anxious, do not stand up for themselves and are more likely to become depressed. In some cases, a child who is bullied sometimes ends up bullying others. These children often respond to being bullied by feeling anxious and aggressive.

Without knowing how to handle these feelings, they target other children who they think will not fight back.

In extreme situations, children who are bullied may commit suicide or lash out violently against those who bullied them. Children who are embarrassed about being bullied may not want to tell their parents or other adults about it.

The list of possible reasons for being bullied is endless. To some extent, the reasons also are irrelevant because they are merely excuses for the bully to continue his or her behavior. The child who is bullied becomes the useful object for the bully to displace his or her anger, frustration or aggression.


How to stop bullying
According to stopbullying.gov, students who have troubles with bullying are often told to tell an adult, but sometimes this could only make things worse and victims feel like there is no hope for their happiness.

A victim should always try to stand up for himself or herself. If the bullying is ended, the victim receives a new feeling of self-confidence. If this only makes things worse, the victim should get help from someone else.

The first person a victim should turn to is an assertive friend or peer. This would be a person who can stand up against what is wrong with good communication skills, not violence. The idea is to let the bully know that the victim is not alone and what they are doing is wrong.

Other students who are bullied can talk to youth leaders, coaches and other extracurricular supervisors. A coach would help especially if the bullying is happening while playing on an athletic team. Youth leaders can help you handle the situation in a way that can help both the victim and the bully.

When a student is being physically harmed, an adult needs to be told. The victim should do so discretely to avoid further violence. Teachers, parents, and police officers can help. Physical abuse is punishable by law.


For more information on bullying, visit www.stopbullying.gov.

(Reprinted from the April edition of Woodmore To Window, a Woodmore student publication, with permission.)

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