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Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

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Oregon City Council recently approved a zoning change request for a Special Use Exception in a C-1 Commercial Industrial District at 4910 Wynnscape Dr. at Lot 9 for the purpose of constructing a 300-foot lattice tower for P&R Communications Service.

“We do believe it’s a good fit for that area,” Mayor Mike Seferian said at the Oct. 25 meeting. “If you stand on that site, I lost count after about 100 towers. You can actually count from that site…all the Edison high tension lines and all the other various towers around there. We believe this company is going to be an asset to our community. They are coming in with currently eight employees. Over the period of a couple of years, they expect to have 20-30 employees.”

The applicant was Steven J. Reeves, president of P&R Communications Service, for owner Robert Dedo of Molly’s Ventures, Ltd.

Martin Malloy, an attorney for P&R Communications, said the tower is not the type seen from a highway.

“This is more of a tower that’s built for their specific business. It will be attached to their building for purposes of disseminating radio waves,” said Malloy.

The company has a business in Dayton, said Malloy, which is expanding into Oregon.

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“Their major customers are fire, EMTs and police departments. They sell radios, entire equipment for the cars and trucks, and then support them with their towers to send communications out to the first responders,” said Malloy.

Seferian said the city may be able to use the company’s services for the city’s own police and fire departments.

“We’re certainly hoping that is the case,” said Malloy.

“Does that mean at some point in the future, is there the possibility we could use that tower for communications with our safety forces possibly?” asked Councilman James Seaman.

“Absolutely,” said Malloy. “There are currently contracts with Perrysburg police and fire. And hopefully, we’ll support the Oregon system in the future, too.”

Seferian said the city has experienced problems with their own communication system.

“We’re always finding zones in our city that are dead zones,” said Seferian. “No one’s ever been able to put a handle on it with the type of repeater system we use. Hopefully, it’s something that could provide a dead zone free service.”

Councilman Sandy Bihn said she was excited by P&R Communications coming into the community. “But the dead zone isn’t just for police and fire. It’s for all of us that have cell phones in the community. I don’t know if there’s any way this could integrate with all the services that are here. But no service works in those dead zones,” she said.

Malloy said the tower would also be available for cell phone providers.

“That’s not the P&R business, but they do rent space on the tower for those providers. That certainly would help in this area,” said Malloy.

He added that the company also plans in the future to provide wireless services to businesses and homes that can’t get cable service.

Chuck Smoot, of S. Wheeling, said he was glad council was addressing the safety issue. “But how is it going to affect Oregon as a whole, and is it going to be cost efficient for the city?” asked Smoot.

“There’s no cost to the city,” said Seferian. “This is a private enterprise.”

He also asked if it would benefit safety services in the city.

“All we can hope is that their communication service is a better service at a better price than what we are currently using,” said Seferian. “Our service is not bad. But it would be better. We would entertain the idea of their proposal and see what they have to offer and how their system could benefit the system we currently have.”

Also at the meeting, council unanimously approved a Special Use Exception in an R-1 Low Density Residential District at 5515 Pickle Road for stabling horses. The owner/applicant was Kimberly Burke.

Burke went before the Planning Commission requesting to house two horses. The Commission had granted the ability to house four horses due the size and nature of the property. Seferian said there was no opposition to the request.

“The people in the area are somewhat used to having horses there, and there was no objection to this proposal,” he said.