The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

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The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency has signed off on the clean-up of a 44-acre parcel on   Miami Street, granting the Maumee Riverfront Improvement Project a covenant not to sue.

The property, located at 1968 Miami Street, had been owned by the Pilkington North America and Libbey Owens Ford glassmaking companies.

 

The agency’s determination the parcel is suitable for redevelopment comes after the City of Toledo and River Road Redevelopment LLC, the current property owner, voluntarily assessed the property and then conducted a clean-up of the site where there were sand ponds that had been used until the 1970s for the disposal of wastewater from glassmaking operations. 

Other sections of the property were used for railroad operations and by the Toledo Sugar Beet Co. to discharge wastewater from its plant across the road.

An assessment of the site found soil contaminated with arsenic and ground water contaminated with arsenic, nickel, chromium, lead, and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate above standards allowed for residential and commercial/industrial use.

The remediation has cleaned part of the property to a suitable level for commercial and industrial use and the EPA’s covenant will be attached to the property deed. It will limit that remediated section to commercial or industrial uses and prohibit the extraction of ground water except for monitoring of the water or in conjunction with construction or excavation activities.

Two feet of soil were removed as part of the clean-up in several areas and replaced by at least 2.5-feet of clean fill dirt. Portions were also re-graded to control erosion.

Another part of the property was cleaned to a standard that allows for residential and recreational use but residential construction will be limited to slab structures with no basements.

The city appropriated about $1.1 million for its share of the clean-up and the Ohio Department of Development, through the Clean Ohio Fund, approved another $3 million for the remediation.

Brad White, a Cincinnati and Dayton-area developer, formed River Road Development specifically for the project. He told The Press in 2006 the company envisioned mixed residential and commercial development, with most of the construction planned for the west side of I-75.


Cities helped
Low-interest loans to the cities of Toledo and Oregon will help them deal with water and sewer issues, the Ohio EPA says.

The agency has approved a $4.53-million loan to Oregon to help finance the construction of a 2-million gallon water storage tank and a trunk water line.

The elevated storage tank will be built along Lallendorf Road north of Seaman Road and will be linked by a 5,300-foot, 16-inch water line between Seaman and Navarre Avenue.

Construction of the tank will take about a year. Work on the water line is expected to begin in June and take about six months.

Total cost is about $6.07 million. The Ohio Public Works Commission and Northwest Water District are also providing funding.

The EPA is also providing a $1 million loan to Toledo to help finance a project designed to eliminate sewer overflows and basement flooding in the area of Delaware Creek.

Toledo constructed a wet weather storage basin, relief sewers and pump station in the River Road area in southwest Toledo in 2006 as part of a federal consent decree with the U.S. and federal EPAs.

Overflows from Delaware Creek continue during heavy storms because the overflow stations are shallow. The city plans to block off the Delaware Creek sewer overflows to force wastewater from this area upstream into the River Road basin.