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Home Oregon-Tornado damaged houses, snapped trees, downed powerlines
Oregon-Tornado damaged houses, snapped trees, downed powerlines
Written by Kelly Kaczala   
Monday, 25 November 2013 09:51

Oregon residents last week were still cleaning up debris caused by a tornado that tore through the city at about 5:35 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 17.

There were reports of damage to multiple houses in several subdivisions, downed powerlines and uprooted trees.

The tornado was one of three that struck the area, according to the National Weather Service. The first twister started in Perrysburg at about 5:35 p.m., cut a 12 mile path into Oregon, where it ended at about 5:55 p.m. The width of the EF-2 tornado was 150-200 yards and had an estimated maximum wind of between 120-125 mph.

The tornado had formed near Lime City Road and U.S. Route 20 in Perrysburg. It reached EF-2 strength near Oregon Road and Route 795 near Perrysburg. It then continued moving northeast at mostly EF-1 or EF-0 strength until reaching EF-2 strength once again in Oregon where several homes were destroyed.

tornadoRoof2b
Robert and Patricia Zeller were inside their home on Lallendorf Rd., Oregon, just
outside of Pearson Metropark when an EF2 tornado struck and took their roof off.
(Press photo by Harold Hamilton/HEHphotos.smugmug.com)

“It appears the damage in Oregon started on State Route 2 east of Coy,” Oregon Mayor Mike Seferian said. “It crossed Lynn Park Estates, a subdivision across from Pearson Metropark, on the Lallendorf side. It hit a few houses on Lallendorf, went straight through Pearson Metropark, where it did a lot of tree damage.”

The tornado then hit Eden Park, a subdivision behind Fire Station No. 1 off Wynn Road, between Seaman Road and Starr Extension, said Seferian, who went out to survey the damage on Monday morning. “It damaged several houses in that subdivision. One house was just being built, it was roughed in, and it was totally leveled. There’s nothing left. The whole house is gone. Just the floor was left.”

The tornado then went north towards Stadium Road, between Seaman and Corduroy roads, and damaged more homes in a subdivision nearby, said Seferian. “It was not as significant as on Eden Park and Lallendort Road. After that, it kind of dissipated. It was a narrow path. No one was injured in the city. We were fortunate it kind of went on a narrow path hitting those areas. Just some power line damage down Seaman Road.”

There was also significant damage to the roof of a Streets Department building at the municipal complex on Seaman Road, he said.

“It’s a pole barn type building. Telephone poles in front of our municipal complex were leaning quite a bit. People were without power for quite a while,” he added.

Trailers for sale in the parking lot of Tractor Supply on Navarre Avenue were blown into a field, he said. “I think it originally touched down at Tractor Supply, right about in that area.”

The front screen of the Sundance Kid drive in theater on Navarre Avenue was also leveled by the storm. The screen was toppled over, surrounded by twisted metal.

Another tornado touched down in Ottawa County at about 6 p.m. It had an estimated maximum wind of 95 mph. The EF-1 twister, about 50-75 yards wide, touched down near Yeasting Road and State Route 590, just three miles east of Elmore, then moved northeast about three quarters of a mile before dissipating, according to the National Weather Service.

A third tornado touched down at about 5:32 p.m. on the northwest side of North Baltimore in Wood County, moved northeast, briefly lifted and then had a second touchdown on the east side of Jerry City. The touchdown in North Baltimore was near Quarry Road and Liberty Road and the touchdown on the east side of Jerry City near Main Street and Huffman Road. The tornado lifted about one mile east along Jerry City Road. The EF-1 tornado followed a seven mile path, was between 75 and 100 yards wide, and had a maximum wind of between 105-110 mph, according to the National Weather Service.

The tornadoes were part of a strong storm system tracked out of the plains that caused widespread severe weather across the Midwest, according to the National Weather Service.  The system, which meteorologists had monitored closely last week, developed as an unseasonably warm air mass that was pulled north in advance of a rapidly strengthening low pressure system.  Local weather forecasts last week had warned of severe weather days in advance due to instability combined with considerable sheer in the low levels of the atmosphere and a strong upper level jet to create the necessary ingredients for a severe weather outbreak.

The last time a tornado struck Oregon was on April 20, 2011. A weak (EF-0) twister caused some property damage, but no injuries.

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By: Kelly Kaczala

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