The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

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If there was an underlying message in Bill Nye’s presentation to the Genoa school board Tuesday, it was to expect the unexpected in the next state budget.

“The governor’s proposed budget isn’t necessarily favorable for Genoa,” Nye said Thursday. “As is the case for many districts. What concerns me the most is the possibility of going on what is called the guarantee list, then the guarantee being taken away in the next budget.”

The district’s net per-pupil amount it receives from the state is currently $4,088.

Highlights of Nye’s update to the board on the governor’s proposal:
• For state foundation funding, a base amount of $5,000 per pupil is proposed instead of the current $5,732.

• A decrease in funding for transportation costs is likely as previous funding levels were based on transportation costs incurred during the 2010-11 fiscal year and the district has eliminated two bus routes since then.

• A loss of federal funding for special education is also likely.

• Current funding received by the Educational Service Center for curriculum programs, pre-school, and other has been proposed to be sent directly to districts instead of being received by the ESCs.

• For gifted education programs, the budget proposes funding of $50 for every student in the district. That would result in an increase of about $20,000 for the gifted program.

Nye projects the August payment of casino-tax revenue should increase to about $55 per student  from $20.21 – a total increase of about $51,000.

Even Gov. John Kasich may have trouble recognizing his proposals for funding education in the next biennium budget, which will go into effect July 1.

Introduced in February in the House of Representatives as part of the state’s operating budget, it has undergone extensive amendments.

One proposal has been described as similar to what was called a Building Blocks” model implemented in 2005 under former Gov. Bob Taft.

That model focused on funding basic school “inputs” and then adding on funding for areas such as special education and teaching low-income students.

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