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Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

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The Hungarian Club of Toledo will host a Wine Tasting on Saturday, January 26, beginning at 7 pm. at the club located at 220 Paine Street, in East Toledo.

According to Zauzi Travis, chairperson of the event, the wine tasting has been held for several years and is a very popular event, with around 50 people attending.

The cost for the tasting is $15, per person. Those attending are also asked to bring an appetizer to share.

“This event is so much fun and people are usually very generous with the amount of appetizers they bring,” Travis said. “The money that is raised is put into the club’s general fund which pays for the utilities for the Hungarian Club.”

Travis’s brother, Norm Heineman, of Bowling Green Beverage, will be showcasing six European wines for the event. The wines that will be served at the tasting event retail from $6.99 to $12.99, per bottle.

Both Travis and Heineman have a great knowledge of fine and approachable wines. They are both members of the Heineman family, which continues to own and operate the Heineman Winery at Put-in-Bay since 1888.

Their father, the late Harry Heineman, was a third generation owner and wine maker with his brother Lewis, who is still at the winery.

According to Heineman, the wines he will be serving and discussing are decidedly “old world” and should help expand attendees’ palates beyond the typical “new world” wines many are accustomed to.

“This will be a taste of European, old world wines as opposed to the new world wines popular in and coming from the new world,” Heineman said adding wines from California and Australia are examples of the new world style of wines. “The new world wines have a big nose. We, in America, drink these wines as cocktails because they drink well on their own.”

“Old world wines are not as impressive in the nose, but they go with food,” Heineman continued. ‘These are the traditional wines they have been doing for centuries. This culture (American) is not necessarily interested in drinking wine with a meal. In Europe, wines are considered foods and the wines themselves like the company of other foods.”

Heineman said he has showcased Hungarian wines at the tasting in years prior, but decided to highlight budget friendly European wines in the hopes that more people will begin to enjoy the libation with food more often.

“Wine is one way of enhancing the experience of meals,” he said. “We should learn to enjoy them more.”

Wines at the tasting will be Moreau Blanc Dry, from France. The wine is largely made from the  chardonnay grape that is blended with other white grape varieties including Chenin Blanc, Folle Blanche, Ugni Blanc and Colombard.

“It is a balanced dry wine,” Heineman said. “It is ideal as an aperitif and it goes great with seafood.”

From Bulgaria, Flowerface Moscato Bianco, a light and elegant dry white wine that is made with no added sugars, will also be tasted.

“From the nose of the wine, it is a wonderful dry wine,” Heineman said. “It will go with anything on your plate which is a hallmark of the old world wines.”

Josef Drathen Spatlese, a Riesling wine from Germany, will also be tasted and discussed.  The wine has apricot and peach notes and goes great with blue veined cheeses, richer foods with sauces and Asian dishes, Heineman said.

“This is a sweeter wine and will be very attractive to people,” Heineman said. “This will be the wine people will ask for more of.”

Heineman will also be bringing Grao Vasco Dao Red, a light bodied red wine from Portugal. Similar to  a pinot noir, it has sour cherry, wild plum and herbal, peppery notes.

“It goes with everything,” Heineman said. “The Portuguese, in my opinion, make the best quality wines of value of any country. The wines are all blends of indigenous grapes they have grown for centuries. This wine also goes with everything.”

From Italy, Heineman will be bringing LaMura Rosso, a dry red wine made from organically grown grapes. It is an Eco-friendly, Sicilian wine that is ideal with, you guessed it, pizza and pasta dishes.

Offley Ruby Port, from Portugal, will round out the evening. The sweet port wine has strawberry and dark berry notes, and goes with cheese and assorted desserts, Heineman said.

Safe parking for the tasting is available at the Birmingham Library or Birmingham Elementary School, Travis said.

For more information or to make a reservation, please email Travis at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 419-349-5539.

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