The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

The Harris-Elmore Public Library levy committee will meet Sept. 16 at 7 p.m. at St. John’s United Church of Christ, 448 E. Rice Street, Elmore.

The group is promoting passage of a 1.1-mill operating levy for the library which will be on the November ballot.

Mary Sue James, Elmore, and Lori Skees, Genoa, are heading the committee.

Information about the ballot issue is available at the library in Elmore and branch library in Genoa.

There is also a Facebook page dedicated to the levy.


Board vacancy
The Ottawa County Board of Developmental Disabilities is seeking to fill a board vacancy effective Oct. 1.  Interested parties should be willing to serve a minimum two-year term, meet monthly at 5 p.m. for meetings (usually the third Monday of the month), and assume committee assignments as directed by the board president.

Applicants must be a permanent resident of Ottawa County and interested and knowledgeable in the field of developmental disabilities.  Applicants who have professional training and experience in business management, finance, law, health care practice, personnel administration, or government service are preferred. 

Contact Melinda Slusser at 567-262-3104 or 419-898-0400 ext. 3104 for information.  Letters of interest are due back to the Ottawa County Board of DD, 235 N Toussaint South Rd., Oak Harbor, by Sept. 20.

 

Elections board to meet
The Ottawa County Board of Elections will meet Sept. 14 at 1:30 p.m. for its regular business meeting.

The meeting will be held in the board office, 8444 W. State Route 163, Oak Harbor.

The top management of CSX Corp. wants to close Walbridge Road at a rail crossing between East Broadway and Tracy Road, the Lake Township trustees were informed Tuesday.

Ken Gilsdorf, community affairs and safety representative for the rail company, told the trustees there have been several near hits between vehicles and trains at the crossing and the company’s chief executive officer wants to proceed with having the road closed to traffic.

One of the near hits occurred while a representative of the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio was on the site, Gilsdorf told the trustees, adding the company’s plans have the tentative backing of the commission.

“We do hold the deed to the land around that area,” he said.

One option would be for CSX to vacate part of the road, Gilsdorf said, and have it become privately owned by adjacent property owners. If a private road was established, CSX could install gates that were controlled remotely by the railroad because there is no yard master stationed at nearby Stanley Yard.

For the township’s emergency vehicles to have access to the crossing, a special phone line would be installed, linking township authorities to the yardmaster at the Walbridge Yard who could open the gates by remote control.

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Last Friday afternoon the yellow school buses rolled to a stop in front of the Lake school complex to drop off studentspic-LakePep2 for the pep rally that was held on the school’s new football field.

Normally the students would have just exited from their classrooms and walked to the stadium. The fact that there was a gaping hole in what was once a continuous building that connected the elementary, middle and high schools was a stark reminder of the devastation that the June 5 tornado wreaked on the school and the normal everyday lives of the Lake students.

The pep rally was held to allow the student to be in the stadium for the first time since it was destroyed. In place of the natural grass was a new synthetic turf field sporting the school colors and monogram.

According to Lee Herman, principal of the middle and high schools, the original field was riddled with debris from the destroyed school buildings. Glass and metal shards, nails, screws and all sorts of other scrap materials were embedded so deeply into the soil – up to six inches down -- that it was virtually impossible to remove it all in order to provide a safe playing surface.

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Former Oregon Fire Chief Gene R. Groll, who worked in the Oregon Volunteer Fire Department for nearly 40 years,pic-GeneGroll is being remembered as a family man who loved being a firefighter.

“Family always came first for my dad,” said Jeff Groll, one of Gene’s five children. “He loved to be a firefighter. Growing up, we always did firefighting things together. If there was a fire department function or a parade, we would always be a part of it.”

Groll, 86, died Wednesday, Sept. 8, after a long illness.

Jeff said his father was the consummate professional, “a firefighter’s firefighter,” who enjoyed helping train the rank and file.

“He was a very good teacher, very patient. He was a very kind person. It was always easy for him to work with people,” said Jeff.

His dad considered the fire department as his extended family, added Jeff.

“It wasn’t just a job. The people he worked with were also family. He thought that people who worked together, and enjoyed themselves together after work, were most effective. If you could play together after work, it was easy to work together.”

Oregon Fire Chief Ed Ellis called Gene “a good guy.”

“He was a very fair and equitable leader. He treated the part-time firefighters like people rather than his subordinates,” said Ellis. “He was easy to talk to and have a discussion with. He was just an all-around, really nice guy.”

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Can a small high school, located in an equally small town actually win a national contest for $500,000? You betcha!

In what could only be described as a meteoric rise to the top, Lake High School went from 21st place to first during the final hours of the Kohl’s Cares Contest.

Once the final validations are in, Lake will be the recipient of the much-needed donation which will help with the school‘s rebuilding efforts. Announced in August, Kohl’s, in celebration of Kohl's Cares® 10th anniversary, is donating $500,000 to 20 schools, for a total of $10 million.

Kohl's Cares® is the company’s philanthropic program that supports children’s health and education.

Votes for schools from across the country were garnered through the company’s Facebook page. Each person was given 20 votes to cast for schools he or she supports. Each person was allowed to cast up to five votes per school. The contest, which brought in 10 million votes, ended at 11:59 p.m. (CDT) Friday, Sept. 3.

According to Elizabeth Urbanowski, a Lake graduate, entering her school into the contest was the easy part. Fighting to get the word out about Lake and its needs turned out to be a 12-hour-a-day job.

From her El Paso, Tex., home, Urbanowski set out on a media and public relations blitz using YouTube as well as various social networking sites.

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Toledo water

Do you feel comfortable drinking water coming from the city of Toledo
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