The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

City Administrator Mike Beasley said last week that he will look into the possible use of wind turbines to power city facilities as a way to cut utility costs.
 
Beasley said he’s looked at the issue for the last several years, but was not sold on the idea.
 
“I’ve looked at the issue of using alternative energy sources for public, governmental buildings over the last 10 years or so,” Beasley said at a committee of the whole meeting Oct. 18. “I had a hard time making the math work so that the cost per kilowatt hour, or for a thousand cubic feet of gas, would work right for the governmental side.”
 
The issue has changed over the years, making it a feasible alternative energy source, he said.
 
“That really has changed in recent times with the public-private partnership model, which allows a private entity to take advantage of tax credits for the alternative energy product, and at the same time, essentially providing power directly to the governmental entity, or having a lease system so that the governmental entity never has a capital obligation,” said Beasley. “In some models, it cashes out in year one for the governmental entity. So you provide an alternative power source and we save money in year one on our bottom line, while at the same time shifting some of our load to sustainable energy. The wind turbine models look very good.”

Pledging to remember the victims of the June 5 tornado and rebuild the community, Lake Township officials broke ground for a new township administration building with a gathering of about 80 persons looking on.
 
“Brick by brick we will rebuild this township,” Mark Hummer, township administrator and police chief said. “June 5th seems like a lifetime ago for a lot of us. Unfortunately it was a lifetime for seven of us.”
 
Melanie Bowen, a township trustee, asked the gathering for a moment of silence for the victims and their families.
 
“We will never forget them, never,” she said.
 
She thanked the many agencies and departments that assisted the township in the aftermath of the storm.

The 32nd Apple Festival recently took place Oct. 9-10, and as usual, the annual festival was successful in attracting thousands of people to the village of Oak Harbor.

The event, which is sponsored by a multitude of local businesses and attracts approximately 30,000 people, takes place the second full weekend in October every year.

The festival, like any other small town event, entices people to return home for a weekend, giving them the chance to connect with old friends and acquaintances they’ve not seen for some time.

“It’s a tradition that seems to catch everyone’s attention,” said Derek Gerber, a 26-year old Columbus resident who grew up in Oak Harbor. “It brings everyone back. I know that when I go home I’m going to see a lot of my friends.”

The two-day event, which closes off several blocks of the downtown area, begins at 9 a.m. on Saturday and ends at just after 6 p.m. on Sunday. The festival features a wide variety of events, including the 5K Apple Run, a car show, the Grand Parade and entertainment from local groups. 

Tiger Ridge Exotics in Stony Ridge has been open to the public for over 30 years.

Owner Kenny Hetrick only asks for donations to help feed and care for over 30 tigers, lions, cougars, leopards, wolves, and bears.

Due to recently upgraded regulations by the United States Department of Agriculture, which regulates exotic animal farms, Tiger Ridge is in need of 1,700 feet of fencing, fence hardware and attachments, concrete, poles, wood, nails, screws, paint and other materials to comply.

The Press obtained copies of the USDA report, dated September 29. The deadline for Hetrick to upgrade is November 1.

“That’s the almost impossible part. I’ve worked on this daylight to dark since they were here. There’s a lot to do,” Hetrick said.

“They came out here and said my regular fence, which is 10 foot high, has to be 12 feet with a three foot overlap. I still haven’t figured out how I’m going to do that (overlap),” Hetrick continued. “My four-foot perimeter fence, that’s my outside perimeter fence, has to be eight feet. All my poles have to be cemented in, and I need eight foot fence bad and I can’t find any anywhere other than new.”

A Lucas County Court of Common Pleas jury recently found several Oregon City officials retaliated against a female police sergeant for her testimony in a previous sexual discrimination lawsuit filed by a female police officer against the city.

The jury awarded Oregon Police Sgt. Kelly Thibert $25,000 in damages.

In addition, the city paid Thibert $85,000 in legal fees.

Thibert’s lawsuit, filed in 2008, accused the Oregon police department, ex-Mayor Marge Brown, and Police Chief Richard Stager of alleged sex discrimination and retaliation after she testified on behalf of former Oregon police officer Candace Elliott, who had filed a lawsuit against the city for sexual discrimination in 2004.

While the jury agreed that Thibert was retaliated against, it did not find Brown and Stager's conduct can be considered sexual discrimination.

Thibert, who has been an Oregon police officer since March, 1993, had alleged that Stager and Brown “acted with reckless disregard” for her rights. “These actions were motivated by Sgt. Thibert’s sex, her participation in prior proceedings concerning allegations of discrimination, and her good-faith reports of discriminatory conduct,” stated the lawsuit.

Bill Cosby

In your opinion, do the allegations against Bill Cosby have any credibility?
384859632 [{"id":"30","title":"Yes","votes":"6","pct":75,"type":"x","order":"1","resources":[]},{"id":"31","title":"No","votes":"2","pct":25,"type":"x","order":"2","resources":[]}] ["#194e84","#3b6b9c","#1f242a","#37414a","#60bb22","#f2babb"] sbar 160 160 /component/communitypolls/vote/13-bill-cosby No answer selected. Please try again. Thank you for your vote. Answers Votes ...