The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

The Woodmore school board has a new member and differing legal opinions on whether he was appointed to the seat in accordance with state law.

During a special May 31 meeting Steve Huss, board president, and Julie Bowman and Corinna Bench voted to appoint Dan Hoppe to the seat vacated last month by Grant Cummings.

Board member Joe Liszak said Monday he declined to attend the meeting and informed other board members by email of his intent to not participate in the vote after receiving an opinion from Norm Solze, assistant Sandusky County prosecutor, on the appointment procedure.

In a May 29 email to Liszak, Solze states he agrees with an earlier opinion by Jim Stucko, an attorney with a Columbus law firm retained by the school board, which says state law requires a school board to fill a vacancy no sooner than 10 days from when the seat was officially vacated but within 30 days of the vacancy.

The state budget bill pending in the Ohio Senate doesn’t “put the dollars where the kids really are,” Jeff Carpenter, treasurer of the Lake Local School District, told the senate’s education finance subcommittee in recent testimony.

He challenged assertions by the Ohio School Board Association, Buckeye Association of School Administrators and other educational organizations that in its current form, the bill, which was adopted in the House of Representatives in April, will leave no district with less state funding in Fiscal Year 2016, which starts July 1, than in fiscal 2015.

“Even the governor’s proposal is more favorable by far than the house’s version,” Carpenter told The Press. “The governor’s proposal is trying to move off the cap and guarantee funding models and get them on the formula. His budget proposal moves in that direction.”

To do his job Scott Frank assumes a variety of identities – from 12-year-old boys to 16-year-old girls and others in between.

Frank, a captain with the Wood County Sheriff’s Department and member of the Ohio Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, has logged more than 4,200 hours online, often posing as a child to track the actions of sexual predators.

In a two-hour program at Lake High School Wednesday, Frank gave about 30 adults a view of the Internet they rarely see but their children might experience on a daily basis.

He described a “surface web” that comprises about 4 percent of what the Internet offers. But he urged parents to become familiar with the “deep web” that comprises the other 96 percent – the part of the Internet often hidden from view and isn’t indexed by search engines.

The Village of Gibsonburg will hold a ceremony June 12 to observe the arrival of an antenna that was atop the North Tower of the World Trade Center in New York prior to the terrorist attack on Sept. 11, 2001.

The 36-foot, 7.000-pound antenna will be placed at a planned memorial at Williams Park to commemorate public safety service.

The memorial will be dedicated on Sept. 11 of next year and is being designed to recognize the “dedication, service and sacrifices of police, fire and EMS and other public safety service personnel from everywhere who give and have given of themselves to make their communities better places for everyone,” said Marc Glotzbecker, village administrator.

The antenna is being transported to the village from JFK Airport in New York by Dan Slack and Steelhorse Transportation.

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation today announced that Lucas County is one of 20 jurisdictions selected to receive a $150,000 grant to create a fairer, more effective local justice system.

The grant is a part of the Safety and Justice Challenge, the Foundation’s $75 million initiative to reduce over-incarceration by changing the way jails are used in the criminal justice system. Lucas County will use the grant to address factors contributing to over-incarceration and develop effective alternatives throughout the criminal justice process.

Lucas County was chosen following a highly competitive selection process that drew applications from nearly 200 jurisdictions from 45 states. The Safety and Justice Challenge competition supports jurisdictions across the country seeking to create more just and effective local justice systems that improve public safety, save taxpayer money, and yield better outcomes. The 20 jurisdictions selected will work with expert consultants to develop a plan for local justice system improvement. In 2016, as many as 10 of these jurisdictions will receive a second round of funding – between $500,000 to $2 million annually – to implement their plans over two years.

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