The Press Newspaper

Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

Share

         Oregon City Administrator Michael Beazley’s annual salary was increased to $143,220 from $132,000 after City Council recently approved an 8 ½ percent pay raise at a meeting on March 26.

        Mayor Mike Seferian said the $11,220 increase in compensation for Beazley was in line with compensation received by bargaining and non-bargaining unit employees.

        “People got raises for years, but Mike Beazley never took one,” said Seferian.

        Beazley was hired on January, 2010 with an annual salary of $120,000. In 2013, Beazley turned down a 2.5 percent raise offered by the mayor.

        It was not the first time Beazley turned down a higher salary.

        Seferian, after defeating incumbent Mayor Marge Brown in 2008, spent some time looking for a new administrator. He wanted Beazley, who was the administrator of Lucas County, even though Beazley had not submitted a resume for the position. Seferian had offered him $135,000 annual salary at the time, but Beazley declined the offer and agreed instead to $120,000. He had also rejected a $5,000 vehicle allowance that was included in the contract of Ken Filipiak, the previous administrator under Marge Brown.

       

Worth the money

        In March of 2015, Beazley’s annual salary went up to $132,000 after he received a 10 percent raise.

        “We were able to get him a raise in 2015,” said Seferian. “It was not retroactive. We just added to his base scale to keep him somewhat along the lines of what everyone else got. I think it’s only fair that he got raises other people got.”

        The new raise will be spread out over three years, he said. The first year, Beazley will receive a 3 percent increase, followed by a 2.75 percent increase the second year, and a 2.75 percent raise the third year.

        “It keeps with our pay equity scale,” said Seferian. “I think it’s a worthy raise.”

        “I think Mike Beazley has done a great job for the city,” said Councilman Tim Zale. “He’s worth the money that we pay him.”

        Zale asked Seferian if Beazley were to leave his position, would the city then cut the salary for the next city administrator.

        “This is a more merit-based salary for him?” asked Zale.

        Seferian said the salary is determined by what skills the candidate brings to the table.

        He described how he negotiated a salary with Beazley when he asked him to be the city administrator.

        “Mike asked me, `What would the compensation package be?’ Seferian said the standard salary for the position was $100,000 to $120,000. He said he offered Beazley $135,000 per year because of his experience.

        “He brought more to the table than what I envisioned us being able to attract,” said Seferian. Beazley said he would accept the position, but only with an annual salary of $120,000, he added.

        Seferian said he hoped the same criteria would apply when determining the salary of the next city administrator.

        “There is a standard in the market, and I think we’re in that market standard. Then it’s going to be the individual themselves - what do they have to offer,” said Seferian.

        “So this position is somewhat set aside from the annual increases that would take place,” said Councilman Steve Hornyak. “Are there any other positions that fall into the same situation that are not addressed annually that would have a two to three year lookback period like this, or is this the only one that you need?”

        “This is the only one other than yours and mine,” said Seferian.

       

In demand

        Beazley has been in demand due to his extensive experience in leadership positions in local government and public policy for over 25 years.

        When Wade Kapszukiewicz was elected Toledo mayor last November, he asked Beazley to serve in his new administration. Beazley committed only to serve on a task force to help the new mayor assemble his administration.

        “I’ve agreed to help with the transition for Toledo’s new mayoral administration,” Beazley said last November in response to rumors he would take a job in Kapszukiewicz’s administration. “We’re talking about ways I can continue to be involved in moving the communities and region forward. But my goal and expectation is to do that from my seat as administrator in Oregon.”

       

       

       

       

 

 

facebook

Has Mark Zuckerberg's testimony before Congress changed your opinion of facebook?
122134326 [{"id":"247","title":"Yes, I am getting off facebook.","votes":"9","pct":32.14,"type":"x","order":"1","resources":[]},{"id":"248","title":"No, I am staying on facebook.","votes":"19","pct":67.86,"type":"x","order":"2","resources":[]}] ["#194e84","#3b6b9c","#1f242a","#37414a","#60bb22","#f2babb"] sbar 160 160 /component/communitypolls/vote/92-facebook No answer selected. Please try again. Thank you for your vote. Answers Votes ...