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Toledo, Ohio & Lake Erie

The Press Newspaper

The Press Newspaper

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State Senator Edna Brown, D-Toledo, last week repeated her call for an alternative to the death penalty following the execution of Ronald Phillips, who was convicted for the 1993 rape and murder of his girl friend’s 3-year-old daughter.
 While appalled by the Phillips’ crimes, Sen. Brown said people should be held accountable for their actions “in an appropriate manner.”


 “Ohio has faced several legal obstacles over the course of more than three years just to obtain proper drugs for executions. There’s a reason why many drug manufacturers will not allow their drugs to be used in this capacity: it’s an outdated and barbaric practice. Aside from difficulties in obtaining drugs, the cost of capital punishment in comparison to life imprisonment is vastly more expensive. Ohio’s taxpayers should not be held accountable for a practice that many agree is deeply flawed.
  “The continued use of capital punishment is wasteful, arbitrary, and always carries the possibility of execution of an innocent person. It’s time that Ohio invests in an alternative,” she said.
 In March, the senator re-introduced a bill that would replace the death penalty with life imprisonment without parole.
 Senate Bill 94 was referred to the Judiciary Committee in March but to date the committee hasn’t scheduled any hearings.
 The legislature is on its summer break. 
 Sen. Brown has introduced similar bills three times during prior general assemblies of the legislature.
 In 2015, she emphasized the need to abolish the death penalty to prevent the execution of an innocent person.
 She posed for photos with three men who were sentenced to death in 1975 and spent a combined total of 105 years in prison before being exonerated.
 The case of Ronald Phillips drew national attention because it was the state’s first execution in  three years.
  He and other inmates were scheduled for execution but received stays due to questions about the state’s lethal injection protocol and the availability of drugs that were used.
 They received a preliminary injunction last January but the U.S. Sixth District Court of Appeals ruled in favor of the state last month.
 The U.S. Supreme Court last week rejected Phillips’ appeal.
 Phillips was 43 years old when executed and spent about half his life imprisoned for the crime, which occurred in Akron.

 

 

 

 

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